Tech sector struggling with gender diversity says key is to involve girls | Toronto Star


Tech companies have long been criticized for their lack of female employees, especially in management and engineering roles. In the last few years, however, the industry has taken note of the gender disparity and it is slowly changing.

READ: Tech sector struggling with gender diversity says key is to involve girls | Toronto Star

Best Fabulist Books | Flavorwire


Best Fabulist Books – Flavorwire

Fabulism, it seems, is having a moment — although whether it’s truly a trend is up for debate. Some might say it’s been right there, purring along all this time, while others might blink and wonder what you’re talking about. Such is always the case with magic. But whether you’re a newbie or an old hat, there are always new corners of the fantastic to discover.

READ: Best Fabulist Books | Flavorwire.

Nearly 100 percent of libraries offer tech training and STEM programs, study finds | DistrictDispatch


According to a new study from the American Library Association ALA, nearly 100 percent of America’s public libraries offer workforce development training programs, online job resources, and technology skills training. Combined with maker spaces, coding classes, and programs dedicated to entrepreneurship and small business development, libraries are equipping U.S. communities with the resources and skills needed to succeed in today’s – and tomorrow’s – global marketplace.

READ: Nearly 100 percent of libraries offer tech training and STEM programs, study finds | DistrictDispatch

Comixology DRM-Free Comics | $1 for Access to 15,000 Marvel Comics | Gizmodo


You Can Finally Download DRM-Free Comic Book Backups From Comixology | Gizmodo
The biggest digital comic book distributor in all of digital comics land, Comixology, just took a relatively unprecedented move for a platform its size. Customers will now be able to download DRM-free backups—meaning when you buy a book, you’ll finally get to own it, too.

You Can Access 15,000 Marvel Comics Right Now For a Buck | Gizmodo
As we all prepare our brains and Twitter feeds for the unstoppable flood of comics and entertainment news that will pour out of San Diego Comic-Con, Marvel announced some news in the quiet before the storm. Now, for 99 cents, readers can gain access to Marvel Unlimited, the publisher’s treasure trove of 15,000 issues from current series (well, at least six months old) and classic golden- and silver-age titles. You can also store up to 12 issues offline so you can read without a reliable Wi-Fi connection. As long as you have a Mac, PC, iOS, or Android device, you’re in business.

 

Bibliotheca Bible Project Blows Up On Kickstarter With Chapterless Bible | HuffPo



Graphic artist and book designer Adam Lewis Greene has envisioned a Bible without chapters and his idea has found incredible success on the crowd-funding site Kickstarter. He hopes his design will emphasize the role of the Bible as a great literary text by taking away conventions which have been added to increase its usability as a tool for study.

The website describes Bibliotheca as “The entire biblical library in four elegant volumes, designed purely for reading. The text is reverently treated in classic typographic style, free of all added conventions such as chapter numbers, verse numbers, section headers, cross references and notes.”

READ: Bibliotheca Bible Project Blows Up On Kickstarter With Chapterless Bible | HuffPo

Apple Secretly Acquired “Pandora For Books” Startup BookLamp To Battle Amazon | TechCrunch


I hope this acquisition translates into a viable book recommendation/review community for Apple’s iBooks. It isn’t a good thing that GoodReads is the dominant book recommendation service, specially with Amazon owning stakes in both GoodReads and LibraryThing. 

READ: Apple Secretly Acquired “Pandora For Books” Startup BookLamp To Battle Amazon | TechCrunch

A Dead-Simple Tool That Lets Anyone Create Interactive Maps | WIRED


Data surrounds us. It’s everywhere, in the most micro sense small gadgets that track calories we’ve burned, or how much water our plants need to the most macro analytics companies that can monitor, for instance, the health of entire populations. But there are precious few companies actively working on helping us make sense of all that data. One of them is Tableau, a software company that turns heaps of data into visualizations for the common man: teachers, doctors, journalists, you name it. To make those tools clearer and cleaner, they recently partnered with Stamen Design, to release three new map templates, which anyone can play around with by downloading Tableau’s free software.

READ MORE A Dead-Simple Tool That Lets Anyone Create Interactive Maps | Design | WIRED.

Read the books that inspired Darwins theory of evolution | Engadget


Charles Darwins Galapagos expedition is one of the most famous scientific voyages in history and now you can see how he fed his mind aboard the Beagle. Darwin Online, which houses the world’s largest Darwin collection, has now published in PDF format what it believes to be all 404 books that Darwin had access to on the ships library. They comprise some 195,000 pages with 5,000 corresponding illustrations in French, English and Spanish from encyclopedias, history books, literature and even a racy Spanish novel. Darwin called his years aboard the Beagle a crucial a period that helped him create his seminal theory of evolution, On the Origin of Species. Though you may not have as much time as Darwin did on the infamously long trip, its worth a look just for the spectacular hand-drawn illustrations.

Access links here: Read the books that inspired Darwins theory of evolution | Engadget

Bee-Inspired Bots Skitter and Swarm at NYCs Museum of Mathematics | Gizmodo


Dr. James McLurkin has a swarm of robots. Individually, theyre not that smart, but a crateful of them behaves in some very complex ways, like the bees that inspired them. Gizmodo got to see the wee machines in action, and while theyre adorable, they represent some serious future bot capabilities.

Dr. McLurkin, a professor of computer science, runs the Multi-Robot Systems Lab at Rice University. He and his team research distributed algorithms for multi-robot systems. In other words, using the combined abilities of several rather simple robots to perform complex tasks. Dr. McLurkin has spent the past three years developing Robot Swarm, an exhibit of his hive-mind bots set to debut at Manhattans Museum of Mathematics in early 2015. This week, Dr. McLurkin gave a sneak preview of the exhibit, and Gizmodo was there.

READ MORE Bee-Inspired Bots Skitter and Swarm at NYCs Museum of Mathematics | Gizmodo