12 Monumental Structures Made From Type | Gizmodo


See them all: 12 Monumental Structures Made From Type | Gizmodo

Type Structures

 

This Gorgeous Game Teaches You the History of Typography | Gizmodo


Do you like type? Did you go see the movie Helvetica and break out in tears of joyful satisfaction at the end credits? Do you have a graphic designer cousin who taught you what sans serif meant, and did you think it was fascinating? You’re going love Type:Rider.

This new game for iOS and Android takes the history of typography and transforms it into a beautifully mesmerizing game.

Then there’s the typography. For each asterisk you collect, you unlock a piece of the history of typography from cave paintings to Comic Sans. Each level represents a different period in human history starting with “Origins” followed by “Gothic” which jumps in around Gutenberg’s time.

Read: This Gorgeous Game Teaches You the History of Typography | Gizmodo.

Type:Rider – TRAILER – EN from Cosmografik on Vimeo.

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Saki Mafundikwa: Ingenuity and elegance in ancient African alphabets | TED.com


From simple alphabets to secret symbolic languages, graphic designer Saki Mafundikwa celebrates the many forms of written communication across the continent of Africa. He highlights the history and legacy that are embodied in written words and symbols, and urges African designers to draw on these graphic forms for fresh inspiration. It’s summed up in his favorite Ghanaian glyph, Sankofa, which means “return and get it” — or “learn from the past.”

via Saki Mafundikwa: Ingenuity and elegance in ancient African alphabets | Video on TED.com.

8 Places to Score Free Fonts Online | Mashable


8 Places to Score Free Fonts Online | Mashable

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10 top typography resources | Typography | Creative Bloq


10 top typography resources | Typography | Creative Bloq

10 top typography resources | Typography | Creative Bloq

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Inside the Printing Studio Where Obsolete Tech Will Never Die | Gizmodo


Before computers became the sole progenitors of almost all our visual artifacts, printing was a labor-intensive task that involved applying incredible pressure to inked blocks using machines weighing thousands of pounds. At the Common Press, in the basement of the University of Pennsylvania’s Fine Arts Building, artists are still using this outdated technology—right down to ink from the same company Ben Franklin used.

via Inside the Printing Studio Where Obsolete Tech Will Never Die | Gizmodo

You can appreciate how far we have come by reviewing the past. Its great the printing press art form is being preserved and still in use today. Along with presses, typefaces are a hobby of many, including Pope Francis I, and there are often announcements of the creation of new fonts such as in the very unique case of the DNA font by Harvard scientists.

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