Cool Bookish Places: The Penguin Bookshop in Toronto | BOOKRIOT #books #publishers #bookstores


Penguin Canada opened a bookshop! And it’s really pretty. SEE THE PICS: Cool Bookish Places: The Penguin Bookshop in Toronto | BOOKRIOT

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This student put 50 million stolen research articles online. And they’re free. | WaPo #academia #journals #research #databases #copyright #publishing #crime


Alexandra Elbakyan is a highbrow pirate in hiding. The 27-year-old graduate student from Kazakhstan is operating a searchable online database of nearly 50 million stolen scholarly journal articles, shattering the $10 billion-per-year paywall of academic publishers. READ MORE: This student put 50 million stolen research articles online. And they’re free. | The Washington Post

The Covert World of People Trying to Edit #Wikipedia for Pay | The Atlantic #longform #studies #reference


This is a long form article discussing editing of Wikipedia content specific to the medical field.

Can the site’s dwindling ranks of volunteer editors protect its articles from the influence of money? READ MORE: The Covert World of People Trying to Edit Wikipedia for Pay | The Atlantic.

Read This Letter From #Scientists Accusing Top Publisher Of #Sexism | BuzzFeed #women #STEM #careers #diversity #genderequality


The letter was signed by 600 [scientists and their supporters] and sent Tuesday to the publisher of Science and to BuzzFeed News. It denounces the elite publisher for sexist columns, an offensive cover photo about trans people, and a snarky tweet from an editor who has since resigned. READ MORE: Read This Letter From Scientists Accusing Top Publisher Of Sexism | BuzzFeed News.

For One Year, This Publisher Will Only Release #Books By #Women | HuffPost #publishing #genderequality


In 2014, only 27 percent of authors represented in The Times Literary Supplement were women, only 40 percent from The Paris Review, only 29 percent from The Nation. These numbers are courtesy of the annual VIDA count, an effort to shed light on gender inequity in the Western literary world.

Although the count, in its fifth year, has promoted positive change — The New York Times has steadily upped its coverage of women, and writer Joanna Walsh declared 2014 the Year of Reading Women as a result — there is still much ground to cover, as the above statistics only begin to indicate. Books about women still don’t win major prizes; books by women are still likely to be packaged as unserious.

To begin to address these discrepancies, author Kamila Shamsie published “a provocation” in the Guardian this month: Let 2018, the centennial anniversary of women’s suffrage in the U.K., be a Year of Publishing Women.

READ MORE: For One Year, This Publisher Will Only Release Books By Women | HuffPost

BookShout Serves Simon & Schuster Ebooks with Cheerios | Digital Book World #ebooks #kids #children


Note: This promotion may only be available to residents of the United States. 

The ebook distribution platform BookShout partners with Cheerios to serve select Simon & Schuster titles to breakfasting children across the U.S.

The publisher’s “Cheer on Reading” literacy program has placed free Simon & Schuster children’s books inside Cheerios boxes since 2003. Now, instead of stuffing print titles into cereal boxes, they’ll come printed with BookShout-provided codes offering free access to one of nine popular children’s ebooks. Each one can be downloaded and read online or through BookShout’s iOS, Android, Kindle or Nook apps.

READ MORE: BookShout Serves Simon & Schuster Ebooks with Cheerios | Digital Book World.

The Insane History of How American Paranoia Ruined and Censored Comic Books | Vox


One of the most hurtful things you can say to a comic book reader is that comic books are for kids.

It’s a chilling insult that the stuff they read — the stuff they love — never advanced beyond its funny-page beginnings. But it’s also — often unknown to comics fans — a blunt reminder of one of the worst things to ever happen to comic books.

Some 60 years ago, during the era of McCarthyism, comic books became a threat. The panic culminated in a Senate hearing in 1954. This, of course, isn’t to say that McCarthyism and the comic book panic were comparable in their human toll. But they share the same symptoms of American fear and a harsh, reactive response to it.

The reaction to the suspected scourge was the Comics Code — a set of rules that spelled out what comics could and couldn’t do. Good had to triumph over evil. Government had to be respected. Marriages never ended in divorce. And it was in the best interests of publishers to remain compliant.

What adults thought was best for children ended up censoring and dissolving away years of progress and artistry, as well as comics that challenged American views on gender and race. Consequently, that cemented the idea that this was a medium for kids — something that we’ve only recently started disbelieving.

READ MORE: The insane history of how American paranoia ruined and censored comic books | Vox

Publishers Know You Didn’t Finish “The Goldfinch” — Here’s What That Means For The Future Of Books | BuzzFeed News


Millions may have held their suspicions, but last month the Canadian e-reader company Kobo confirmed it: Most people who buy The Goldfinch don’t actually finish it. According to the company’s data, less than half of Canadian and British Kobo readers in 2014 made it to the end of Donna Tartt’s behemoth novel, one of the best-selling of the year.

How did Kobo know this? Like every e-reader and reading-app maker today, the company, a subsidiary of the Japanese e-commerce titan Rakuten, has access to a comprehensive suite of data about the reading behavior of its users. In a white paper titled “Publishing in the Era of Big Data” and released this fall, the company announced that “with the onset of digital reading … it is now possible to know how a customer engages with the book itself — what books were left unopened, which were read to the very last word and how quickly.” In other words, if you read books digitally, the people who serve you those books more than likely know just what kind of reader you are…READ MORE: Publishers Know You Didn’t Finish “The Goldfinch” — Here’s What That Means For The Future Of Books | BuzzFeed News.

The Best Books of 2014 – The Ultimate List [Infographic] | BookBub Blog


Of all the books published over the last 12 months, which were the very best? We wanted to get a sense of the consensus, so we aggregated 23 different Best of 2014 lists — from The Washington Post to Library Journal to Buzzfeed and more. Then we compiled rankings based on the number of times each books was listed.

Below you’ll find an infographic that highlights the top-ranked books.  (We created separate infographics for books in the romance, mystery & thriller, business, young adult, and nonfiction categories.) We hope you find some great new books on these lists — we certainly did! via The Best Books of 2014 | The Ultimate List | BookBub Blog

Mattel Pulls Sexist Barbie Book “I Can Be A Computer Engineer” Off Amazon | TechCrunch


The makers of Barbie seem to apologize A LOT for underestimating young women. This time the Internet’s buzzing over a pretty cringe-worthy Barbie book, “I Can Be A Computer Engineer,” published out of Random House.

READ MORE: Mattel Pulls Sexist Barbie Book “I Can Be A Computer Engineer” Off Amazon | TechCrunch.