Evo Is a Little Robot With a Big Mission: Get Girls to Code | WIRED #coding #STEM #tech #women #robots #education #gadgets


WHEN HIS DAUGHTERS were young, Nader Hamda says, they were really into apps and computers. But now that they’re a little older, their interest is waning. And that’s not unusual. “They’re not an exception,” he says. “They’re more of a rule.”

Sadly, this is true. According to numerous studies, young girls are moving away from computer science, not towards it. And Hamda says this is why his company, Ozobot, is now offering an educational robot called Evo. Evo is small and spherical, only about an inch in diameter. It looks kinda like an IBM Selectric type ball. But it’s also designed to be social.

READ MORE: Evo Is a Little Robot With a Big Mission: Get Girls to Code | WIRED

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Marvel launches contest encouraging teen girls to pursue science and tech | Mashable #STEM #tech #education #gender #equality #contests


Emily VanCamp and Elizabeth Olsen just introduced the Captain America: Civil War challenge, an opportunity for girls between the ages of 15-18 to explore science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) projects that “have the potential of creating positive change in the world.” READ MORE: Marvel launches contest encouraging teen girls to pursue science and tech | Mashable

Michael Kimmel: Why #gender #equality is good for everyone — #men included | TED.com #women #society #culture #feminism


Yes, we all know it’s the right thing to do. But Michael Kimmel makes the surprising, funny, practical case for treating men and women equally in the workplace and at home. It’s not a zero-sum game, but a win-win that will result in more opportunity and more happiness for everybody. Source: Why gender equality is good for everyone — men included | TED.com

We Aren’t Imagining It: The #Tech Industry Needs More #Women | LifeHacker #diversity #STEM #gender #skills #sexism #racism #discrimination


This evening I’m giving a talk to my daughter’s Girl Scouts troop about careers in technology. I’m going to tell them that women have done amazing things in tech. I’m going to tell them that they too can do anything they set their minds to in this arena. But I will be lying to them. “You can do whatever you set your mind to” is a half-truth, because there are real obstacles—if not barriers—that keep women and minorities from truly thriving in this field. The tech industry has a diversity problem, and it’s a problem not just for these young girls, but for all of us. READ MORE: We Aren’t Imagining It: The Tech Industry Needs More Women | LifeHacker

Why Aren’t There More #Women in #Tech? | Next Generation #infographics #genderdiversity #STEM #employment #sexism #equality


Women are under-represented in the tech sector. Not only that, but they’re underpaid, often passed for promotions and faced with every day sexism. It’s no wonder women are more likely to leave the industry within a year compared to their male counterparts. MORE: Why Aren’t There More Women in Tech? | Next Generation

Video Games Have a #Diversity Problem that Runs Deeper than #Race or #Gender | The Guardian #tech #gaming #genres


Blockbuster releases are homogenising around a narrow range of experiences and it could be driving creative people out of the industry. READ: Video games have a diversity problem that runs deeper than race or gender | Technology | The Guardian

Elizabeth Nyamayaro: An invitation to #Men Who Want a Better World for #Women | TED.com #HeForShe #genderequality


Around the world, women still struggle for equality in basic matters like access to education, equal pay and the right to vote. But how to enlist everyone, men and women, as allies for change? Meet Elizabeth Nyamayaro, head of UN Women’s HeForShe initiative, which has created more than 2.4 billion social media conversations about a more equal world. She invites us all to join in as allies in our shared humanity. TRANSCRIPT: An invitation to men who want a better world for women | TED Talk | TED.com

This Girls’ Summer Camp Could Help Change the World of #AI | WIRED #women #tech #genderequality #STEM


IN A SPARSE lecture room at Stanford University, six students are rehearsing a presentation they’ll later give to a roomful of VIPs from the university’s artificial intelligence lab…It’s presentation day at SAILORS, the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory’s Outreach Summer program, the country’s first AI summer camp for girls. Backed by more than forty university professors, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students from the lab, as well as big-name corporate sponsors like Google, the camp aims to remove the Achilles heel of AI research and, indeed, computer science as a whole: there aren’t enough women. READ MORE: This Girls’ Summer Camp Could Help Change the World of AI | WIRED

5 Ways #Women Can Help Women Succeed in the #Workplace | Mashable #business #genderequality


It’s a tough climb to the c-suite — especially for women. Women make up only 4.6% of CEOs in S&P 500 companies, according to 2015 numbers from advocacy group Catalyst. Women accounted for only 3.3% of CEOs in the top 100 companies in Silicon Valley in 2014, according to numbers from Fenwick. It’s not as though these companies have a small pool of women to choose from. In fact, women make up 45% of the labor force in S&P 500 companies. But that percentage dwindles on each step of the corporate ladder, meaning that there are fewer female candidates in the pipeline when it comes time to name a new manager, board member, or executive. And that’s ultimately bad business for companies.

One Massachusetts Institute of Technology study found that an even gender split increased a company’s revenue by 41%, and a Catalyst study found that companies with more women on their boards performed better when it came to sales, equity, and invested capital. In short: more women at the top can lead to better business. READ MORE: 5 ways women can help women succeed in the workplace | Mashable

Where Are The #Women In #Tech? #Coding Bootcamps | Fast Company #diversity #STEM


Only 29% of all employees across the most influential U.S. technology companies—Google, Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, and Intel—are women. But that includes salespeople, service workers, and communications professionals. Companies that break out gender ratio by role report an an even more drastic disparity. At Twitter, 10% of technical workers are women. At Facebook, it’s 16%.

Computer science programs across the country report a similar dearth of women. As of 2012, the last year for which the National Science Foundation has published data, only about 18% of degrees in the field were obtained by women, the lowest percentage of any STEM discipline. But there is one corner of this pale, male landscape that has less of a gender imbalance than others: coding schools. READ MORE: Where Are The Women In Tech? Coding Bootcamps | Fast Company | Business + Innovation.