Millennials’ love of public libraries is driving an evolution in the design and culture of book repositories | Quartz #design #libraries #youth #community #spaces


Long live the public library! It’s not dead yet. The internet hasn’t rendered physical reference centers obsolete, thanks to millennials. According to a new analysis of Pew Research Center data on US library attendance, millennials more than other generations appear to have a use for physical libraries. They may not always come for the books, but the country’s youngest adults show up. That works out well because librarians have been designing with them in mind. READ MORE: Millennials’ love of public libraries is driving an evolution in the design and culture of book repositories — Quartz

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Top 10 Tech | 2016 | School Library Journal #STEM #coding #tech #youth #kids #education #gadgets #learning #makerspace


Scratch is a great coding platform, so I imagine ScratchJr is fantastic too. Love to get my greedy little hands on the Sphero SPRK+.

Our picks highlight leading tech trends, with an eye toward the future. READ: Top 10 Tech | 2016 | School Library Journal

More than 1.8 million teens are reading books by text messages thanks to this startup | Washington Post  #SMS #texting #reading #books #youth #YA #mobile #storytelling #teens


OK, it’s not exactly Dickens. But how about a great story delivered to you by text message? That’s the idea hatched by Prerna Gupta and Parag Chordia. The two entrepreneurs launched their company, Telepathic, a year ago with an application called Hooked after raising $1.9 million from investors that included numerous venture capital firms and Lean Startup author Eric Rie… And the kids, they do love it. READ MORE: More than 1.8 million teens are reading books by text messages thanks to this start-up | The Washington Post

Boy Who Couldn’t Afford #Books Asks Mailman For Junk Mail To Read; Mailman Responds Spectacularly | HuffPost #reading #kids


Twelve-year-old Mathew Flores is a bit different from the rest of us. He loves junk mail. Until recently, advertisements were the only reading materials available to the boy. Flores loves reading so much that he approached his mailman in a Salt Lake City suburb on Friday to ask if he could have any junk mail. The strange question prompted the mailman, Ron Lynch, to ask why. READ MORE: Boy Who Couldn’t Afford Books Asks Mailman For Junk Mail To Read; Mailman Responds Spectacularly | HuffPost.

Free: Neil deGrasse Tyson’s Short Course, The Inexplicable Universe | Open Culture + #CampGoogle For Kids | Camp.WithGoogle #MOOCs #science


Free: Download Neil deGrasse Tyson’s Short Course, The Inexplicable Universe, in Audio or Video Format | Open Culture
For now, The Great Courses will let you access Tyson’s Great Course for free, including all of its downloadable audio and video lectures, as long as you make an account at their site — a process which, we can report, entails only a reasonable hassle factor.

Camp Google | Camp.WithGoogle.com
Camp Google is a free summer camp that gets kids learning through fun, interactive science activities and adventures. Led by experts, the activities have been designed to encourage kids to ask questions, setting them on a lifelong journey of exploration and discovery. Everyone is welcome, and you can jump in anytime.

Can These Tiny #Robots Teach Fourth Graders How To Code? | Fast Company #coding #kids #tech #makerspaces



I’m in a laboratory at Drexel University watching a remote-controlled robot do a spastic breakdance across the floor. The fist-sized, brightly colored bot looks simple enough: It has two wheels, two antennae, and what appears to be a friendly face. But it has a mission much bigger and more ambitious than its tiny form factor: This thing wants to teach kids how to become programmers.

This freewheeling toy android comes from a young startup called LocoRobo. Its moves are set using a mobile app that allows the user to program simple actions: go forward, accelerate, spin around, stop. And while plenty of kids would be content to play with a smartphone-controlled toy robot, LocoRobo wants to let them dig much deeper into the code and sensors that make it work. READ MORE: Can These Tiny Robots Teach Fourth Graders How To Code? | Fast Company | Business + Innovation.

Vortex Is A Toy Robot That Teaches #Kids How To Code | TechCrunch #robots #kids #coding #makerspaces



DFRobot, a company that has been building robots for the education market since 2008, this week introduced its first attempt at making a robot accessible to all children, with the debut of Vortex – an interactive, programmable robot aimed at kids 6 and up. The Vortex robot pairs with iOS and Android smartphones or tablets over Bluetooth, and lets kids control its movement by tapping the screen in the Vortex app to initiate commands. It also comes four free, pre-programmed games – “bumping fight,” “virtual golf,” “driving,” and “robot soccer,” which can later be customized by the child to create their own play experience. READ MORE: Vortex Is A Toy Robot That Teaches Kids How To Code | TechCrunch.

I Never Noticed How Racist So Many Children’s #Books Are Until I Started #Reading to My #Kids [Opinion] | Vox #diversity #racism #culture


What happened to Little Black Sambo? As a white girl growing up in West Virginia in the 1970s, I remember it on my childhood bookshelf. It was on my friends’ shelves too. It may also have been in the dentist’s office, along with Highlights for Children and Joseph and His Coat of Many Colors.

It was not on the shelves of the local day care, a center run by an entrepreneurial black woman who saw a business opportunity in the droves of young white mothers who were socialized in the 1950s and ’60s to be housewives and then dumped into the workforce by the 1970s economy.

I remember the story primarily for its description of the tigers chasing one another round and round a tree until they melt into butter, butter that Sambo’s mother uses for a stack of crispy pancakes. In the 35 intervening years, I knew the book had been relegated to the dustbin of racist cultural artifacts, but I didn’t remember it well enough to know why. READ MORE: I never noticed how racist so many children’s books are until I started reading to my kids | Vox.

10+ Free #Workshops to Keep #Kids Busy This Summer | LifeHacker


List of workshops relates mainly to residents living in the USA. Broken out into the following categories: technology, crafts and building, and lastly outdoor and indoor sports. At least provides parents and caregivers living in other countries workshop/project/camp ideas. I suggest looking at summer programming at your local community library!

School’s out, but that doesn’t mean kids have to stop learning or being creative. The free workshops and activities below will keep kids from getting bored and parents from wondering what to do with them every day or weekend. MORE: 10+ Free Workshops to Keep Kids Busy This Summer | LifeHacker

Connecting #Inmates With Their #Children Through #Books | Marketplace.org #prisons #communication #tech #libraries


As part of our series about technology in prisons called “Jailbreak,” we paid a visit to a new program that uses technology to fill an important role in the development of the children of those who are incarcerated.

Organizers say the TeleStory program the first of its kind in the country. At the main branch of the Brooklyn Public Library in New York, families of inmates bring their children to a special room filled with toys and books. Even more unique: the room is virtually connected to a prison on Rikers Island. via Connecting inmates with their children through books | Marketplace.org.