Human Library Stories [Video] | CBC #libraries #documentaries #culture #stereotypes #society


http://www.cbc.ca/i/caffeine/syndicate/?mediaId=2674238485

This 45-minute documentary delves into the stories of the human books who participated in the CBC’s Human Library project…. SOURCE: Human Library Stories | Absolutely Ottawa | CBC Player

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Read This Letter From #Scientists Accusing Top Publisher Of #Sexism | BuzzFeed #women #STEM #careers #diversity #genderequality


The letter was signed by 600 [scientists and their supporters] and sent Tuesday to the publisher of Science and to BuzzFeed News. It denounces the elite publisher for sexist columns, an offensive cover photo about trans people, and a snarky tweet from an editor who has since resigned. READ MORE: Read This Letter From Scientists Accusing Top Publisher Of Sexism | BuzzFeed News.

I Never Noticed How Racist So Many Children’s #Books Are Until I Started #Reading to My #Kids [Opinion] | Vox #diversity #racism #culture


What happened to Little Black Sambo? As a white girl growing up in West Virginia in the 1970s, I remember it on my childhood bookshelf. It was on my friends’ shelves too. It may also have been in the dentist’s office, along with Highlights for Children and Joseph and His Coat of Many Colors.

It was not on the shelves of the local day care, a center run by an entrepreneurial black woman who saw a business opportunity in the droves of young white mothers who were socialized in the 1950s and ’60s to be housewives and then dumped into the workforce by the 1970s economy.

I remember the story primarily for its description of the tigers chasing one another round and round a tree until they melt into butter, butter that Sambo’s mother uses for a stack of crispy pancakes. In the 35 intervening years, I knew the book had been relegated to the dustbin of racist cultural artifacts, but I didn’t remember it well enough to know why. READ MORE: I never noticed how racist so many children’s books are until I started reading to my kids | Vox.

Debugging The Gender Gap: This Movie With A Mission Seeks To Inspire Women In Tech | Fast Company #gender #women


CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap Theatrical Trailer from Finish Line Features, LLC on Vimeo.

[P]erhaps it’s no surprise that just 0.5% of the college degrees awarded each year in the United States go to women majoring in computer science. After they graduate and enter the workforce, women’s representation in technology declines even further.

That dismal state of affairs was news to documentary film director Robin Hauser Reynolds. She started her career in finance, a firsthand witness to harassment and grabby hands on the floor of the London stock exchange. Reynolds knew little about the gender imbalances in Silicon Valley. But as she began to interview women technologists, starting in February of last year, their stories resonated with her. The result is captured in her new film, CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap.

READ MORE: Debugging The Gender Gap: This Movie With A Mission Seeks To Inspire Women In Tech | Fast Company | Business + Innovation.

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  • The Representation Project: The Representation Project inspires individuals and communities to challenge and overcome limiting stereotypes so that everyone, regardless of gender, race, class, age, sexual orientation or circumstance can fulfill their human potential. About the Miss Representation film.

Who Wants to Work for a Woman? | Joan C. Williams | HBR


Full Post

The year my husband was born (1953), only 5% of Americans preferred a female boss. That number has climbed to 23%, according to a new Gallup survey. The proportion of people who prefer to work for men fell precipitously, from two-thirds in 1953 to about one-third today.

Perhaps even more important is the sharp rise in Americans who expressed no preference, even when cued to care. Gallup’s question asked, “If you were taking a new job and had your choice of boss, would you prefer a man or a woman?” Only 25% of Americans expressed no preference in 1953 but today it’s 41%. More good news: more people judge their bosses not by their gender, but as people. This is more likely to be true the higher the level of the job. Only 36% of those with high school or less, but 46% of those postgraduate degrees, expressed no preference.

Male privilege, you might say, ain’t what it used to be.

Americans' Preference for Gender of Boss Chart

Once we scratch the surface, though, the news is nastier. Americans who currently work for men are twice as likely to prefer to do so. Only 16% of Republicans prefer a woman boss. American women still face a steep uphill climb, something the pipeline won’t fix: young people (18 to 34) are more likely to want a male boss and less likely to express no preference than Americans aged 35 to 54.

Americans' Preference of Gender of Boss, by Category Chart

Most striking is that a much higher percentage (40%) of women than men (29%) prefer to work for a man. Women also are more likely than men to prefer to work for a woman: 27% of women versus only 18% of men.

Both these statistics are puzzling, but I may have an explanation for each.

Women might prefer to work with women for two reasons. They might, first, feel this offers them some protection from gender bias, including sexual harassment. Second, women without college degrees typically are in pink-collar jobs that have a distinctly feminine feel a male boss might disrupt.

How about the women who prefer a male boss? Have they just been burned by Devils Wearing Prada?

They may have experienced workplaces where gender bias pits women against other women, a patternThe New Girls’ Network calls the “Tug of War.” An important 2010 study of legal secretaries by law professor Felice Batlan illustrates this dynamic, as does my own research. Batlan surveyed 142 legal secretaries and found that not one preferred to work for a woman partner (although, importantly, 47% expressed no preference).

Why did many secretaries prefer male bosses? Simple: they aren’t dummies. In most law firms, most people who hold power are men. Women stall out about 10 to 20% of the time in upper-level management in professional fields like business and law, so if you’re aiming to hitch your wagon to a shooting star, men are a better bet. This is one way gender bias pits women against women.

Another is when women stereotype other women. “I just feel that men are more flexible and less emotional than women,” one secretary said, while another described women lawyers as “too emotional and demeaning.” The stereotype that women are too emotional goes back hundreds of years.

But “demeaning”? That’s interesting. Her boss may just be a jerk — some people are — but perhaps she was just busy. While a busy man is busy, a busy woman, all too often, is a bitch. Because high-level jobs are seen as masculine, women need to behave in masculine ways in order to be seen as competent. But if they behave too much like men — watch out.

This no-win situation fuels conflict between women who just want to be one of the guys and those who remain loyal to feminine traditions. “Secretaries are expected to engage in traditionally feminine behavior such as care giving and nurtur[ing], where[as] women attorneys are supposed to engage in what is stereotypically more masculine behavior. Given these very different expectations and performances of gender that occur in the same space, the potential for conflict is enormous,” Batlan concludes. Indeed, many professionals find themselves expected to do what Pamela Bettis and Natalie G. Adams, in an unpublished paper, call “nice work”: being attentive and approachable in ways that are often time-consuming and compulsory for women but optional for men.

Conflict also erupts due to Prove-It-Again problems: women managers have to provide more evidence of competence as men in order to be seen as equally competent. This pattern again pits women against their bosses. “It would seem as if female associates/partners feel they have something to prove to everyone,” noted one secretary. “Females are harder on their female assistants, more detail-oriented, and they have to try harder to prove themselves, so they put that on you,” said another.

But it’s not just female assistants who voice concerns about their bosses.

The interviewees for my forthcoming book What Works for Women at Work, co-written with my daughter Rachel Dempsey, illustrate yet another dynamic: some admins make demands on female bosses that they don’t make on men. And like many types of gender bias, this one’s inflected by race. One black scientist I interviewed felt her relationship with white administrative assistants was strained because, she said, she didn’t share their habit of bonding by sharing personal information (what Deborah Tannen called “troubles talk”). Black admins “just do not expect me to want to know anything about their personal business,” she said with some relief.

Women bosses also often feel that admins prioritize men’s work. One scientist I interviewed noted that administrative staff took longer to complete work given by women than men. Another agreed: “My stuff won’t get done first.” “They say the bosses are too demanding,” said a third, recalling a conversation with admins who worked with her. She had responded, “Well, the boss that you had before was equally demanding. The guy that you were working under was equally demanding.” The admins’ reaction: “Yeah, but that’s different.” Again, the secretaries know which side the butter’s on. And the female scientists I interviewed typically felt less powerful than their male counterparts.

As usual, gender dynamics are far from simple. The Gallup study confirms the eternal story: when it comes to gender flux, the glass is half full — employees now are more comfortable with female leaders and are more likely to simply treat people as people, leaving traditional gender stereotypes behind. But the glass is also resounding, maddeningly, persistently half empty. I read the evidence that more women than men prefer to work for women as evidence of persistent gender bias. And I read the evidence that more women than men prefer to work for men the same way.

Who Wants to Work for a Woman? | Joan C. Williams | Harvard Business Review

Marvel Muslim Girl Superhero Kamala Khan Destroys Bad Guys As Well As Stereotypes | HuffPost


Kamala Khan isn’t your average teenage Muslim girl. Though she lives in New Jersey and juggles the identity crisis that’s often part-and-parcel of growing up Muslim-American, her shape-shifting is of a literal sort. That’s because Kamala Khan is a superhero, code-named Ms. Marvel.

In February, Marvel Comics will launch a series featuring the shape-shifting Khan, who fights family expectations as well as supervillains, reports The New York Times.

Read more: Marvel Muslim Girl Superhero Kamala Khan Destroys Bad Guys As Well As Stereotypes | HuffPost.

Ms. Marvel