Hands-On With the World’s First Flexible Wearable | WIRED #wearables #digital #tech #displays


PHIL INAGAKI DOESN’T like to call the Wove Band a smartwatch. The CEO and co-founder of flexible electronics company Polyera would rather call his team’s creation a “device” or a “digital canvas” than evoke the mental image of a wrist-worn timepiece. READ MORE: Hands-On With the World’s First Flexible Wearable | WIRED

Google Cardboard Is The Right Virtual-Reality Gadget For Right Now. But What’s Next? | Fast Company


I’d like to try the Cardboard experience to compare to the Oculus Rift. I tried OR at Netspeed 2014, experiencing an under water universe (boring with unwieldy navigation) and a roller coaster (exciting; definitely created a unique, visceral experience that made me want to puke my guts out after). Looking forward to more virtual reality experiences as the tech and devices evolve.

Google Cardboard Is The Right Virtual-Reality Gadget For Right Now. But Whats Next? | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

Google Cardboard has come a long way since Android honcho Sundar Pichai introduced it with a sheepish grin six months ago. The smartphone virtual reality viewer, made from folded-up cardboard with a pair of attached lenses—you supply an Android phone to provide computing power and a display—has shipped more than 500,000 units as of early December. (You can build your own Cardboard, or buy a ready-made version from not-quite-official sources for under $30.) Google has now added a Play Store showcase for the best Cardboard apps, and released a software development kit to spur even more VR app creation.

For a project that took mere weeks to throw together, Cardboard has done surprisingly well. But its success also puts it in an awkward position, somewhere between the oddball project that Cardboard appeared to be back in June and the serious business that prompted Facebooks $2 billion acquisition of Oculus VR in February. As virtual reality matures, is Cardboard prepared to mature with it?

READ MORE: Google Cardboard Is The Right Virtual-Reality Gadget For Right Now. But What’s Next? | Fast Company | Business + Innovation.

A Creatives Quick Guide to Social Media Image Sizes | Design Instruct


This Design Instruct post lists optimum image sizing for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Google+, Behance and Dribble. The post will be updated as sizing for these platforms evolve…now I just wish this information was visualized in a infographic for us visual learners!

Social media is a way of life for a lot of people. For creatives, it’s a great way to get your work out there and potentially gain a following…Depending on what kind of work you do and how well people respond to it, social media can be a very effective self-marketing tool for many creatives. Therefore, it’s important that your work looks the best that it can look online. Since social media platforms over the last decade have been continually evolving and optimizing, it has not always been clear how best to display your work on these platforms. Luckily, we’ve managed to do a bit of research on how different social media platforms display images so that others can see your work in the best possible way.

READ MORE: A Creatives Quick Guide to Social Media Image Sizes | Design Instruct

MIT Develops a Phone Screen That Corrects Poor Vision | WIRED


Researchers from MIT and the University of California, Berkeley have created a prototype for a new display technology that can automatically correct for vision defects. Think of it as glasses for your iPad. Or your phone, or your car dashboard or any number of screen-based devices you have in your life. The point being, someday in the not too distant future you won’t need to wear glasses anymore to do certain tasks.

READ MORE: MIT Develops a Phone Screen That Corrects Poor Vision | Design | WIRED.

Display Technology Makes Reading Glasses Unnecessary | MIT Technology Review


Researchers are developing technology that can adjust an image on a display so you can see it clearly without corrective lenses. READ: Display Technology Makes Reading Glasses Unnecessary | MIT Technology Review.

An Ingenious Museum Design That Turns Visitors Into Creators | WIRED


An Ingenious Museum Design That Turns Visitors Into Creators | Design | WIRED

In the revamped Cooper Hewitt, still in Carnegie Mansion, there will be around 15 new interactive screen displays where users can draw, design, and virtually explore the Cooper Hewitt collection. Much of this will happen via an electronic pen conceived by Local Projects and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and designed by Cooper Hewitt, GE, Sistelnetworks and Undercurrent. Each is paired with a unique URL on the visitor’s ticket, and as guests pass through different galleries they can touch the tip of their pen to wall text next to objects they find interesting, or inspiring. The pen then stores those selections. The museum still is finalizing details, but either way what follows will be a free-flowing, open-ended experience: with their pen, visitors can download all their selected items into a screen, and begin designing.

Read More: An Ingenious Museum Design That Turns Visitors Into Creators | Design | WIRED

MIT Invents A Shapeshifting Display You Can Reach Through And Touch | Co.Design


We live in an age of touch-screen interfaces, but what will the UIs of the future look like? Will they continue to be made up of ghostly pixels, or will they be made of atoms that you can reach out and touch?

At the MIT Media Lab, the Tangible Media Group believes the future of computing is tactile. Unveiled today, the inFORM is MIT’s new scrying pool for imagining the interfaces of tomorrow. Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that’s only the beginning.

Read more: MIT Invents A Shapeshifting Display You Can Reach Through And Touch | Co.Design | business + design.

Flexible Screen Displays: The How, When, And Why | Information Space


Quotable: “Flexible and curved screens open up all kinds of interesting design opportunities. Imagine a screen wrapped around a telephone pole, on the outside of a water bottle, or even as a tablecloth, or one covering the seat of a chair. The possibilities are endless.”

via Flexible Screen Displays: The How, When, And Why | Information Space.