Nice or Tough: Which Approach Engages Employees Most? | HBR


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It’s probably no news to most people who work that poor leaders produce disgruntled, unengaged employees. Our research also shows convincingly that great leaders do the opposite — that is, that they produce highly committed, engaged, and productive employees.

And the difference is cavernous — in a study of 160,576 employees working for 30,661 leaders at hundreds of companies around the world, we found average commitment scores in the bottom quarter for those unfortunate enough to work for the worst leaders (those leaders who had been rated in the bottom 10th percentile by their bosses, colleagues, and direct reports on 360 assessments of their leadership abilities). By contrast, average commitment scores for those fortunate enough to work for the best leaders (those rated in the 90th percentile) soared to the top 20th percentile. More simply put, the people working for the really bad leaders were more unhappy than three quarters of the group; the ones working for the really excellent leaders were more committed than eight out of ten of their counterparts.

What exactly fosters this engagement? During our time in the training and development industry we’ve observed two common — and very different — approaches. On the one hand are leaders we call “drivers”; on the other, those we call “enhancers.”

Drivers are very good at establishing high standards of excellence, getting people to stretch for goals that go beyond what they originally thought possible, keeping people focused on the highest priority goals and objectives, doing everything possible to achieve those goals, and continually improving.

Enhancers, by contrast, are very good at staying in touch with the issues and concerns of others, acting as role models, giving honest feedback in a helpful way, developing people, and maintaining trust.

Which approach works best? When we asked people in an informal survey which was most likely to increase engagement, the vast majority opted for the enhancer approach. In fact, most leaders we’ve coached have told us that they believe the way to increase employee commitment was to be the “nice guy or gal.”

But the numbers tell a more complicated story. In our survey, we asked the employees not only about their level of engagement but also explicitly, on a scale of one to five, to what degree they felt their leaders fit our profiles for enhances and drivers. We judged those leaders “effective” as enhancers or drivers who scored in the 75th percentile (that is, higher than three out of four of their peers) on those questions.

Putting the two sets of data together, what we found was this: Only 8.9% of employees working for leaders they judged effective at driving but not at enhancing also rated themselves in the 10% in terms of engagement. That wasn’t very surprising to many people who assume that most employees don’t respond well to pushy or demanding leaders. But those working for those they judged as effective enhancers were even less engaged (well, slightly less). Only 6.7% of those scored in the top 10% in their levels of engagement.

Better to be Nice and Tough Chart

Essentially, our analysis suggests, that neither approach is sufficient in itself. Rather, both are needed to make real headway in increasing employee engagement. In fact, fully 68% of the employees working for leaders they rated as both effective enhancers and drivers scored in the top 10% on overall satisfaction and engagement with the organization.

Clearly, we were asking the wrong question, when we set out to determine which approach was best. Leaders need to think in terms of “and” not “or.” Leaders with highly engaged employees know how to demand a great deal from employees, but are also seen as considerate, trusting, collaborative, and great developers of people.

In our view, the lesson then is that those of you who consider yourself to be drivers should not be afraid to be the “nice guy.” And all of you aspiring nice guys should not view that as incompatable with setting demanding goals. The two approaches are like the oars of a boat. Both need to be used with equal force to maximize the engagement of direct reports.

via Nice or Tough: Which Approach Engages Employees Most? | Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman | Harvard Business Review.

10 Things Extraordinary Bosses Give Employees | Inc.com


Good bosses care about getting important things done. Exceptional bosses care about their people. Good bosses have strong organizational skills. Good bosses have solid decision-making skills. Good bosses get important things done.

Exceptional bosses do all of the above–and more. Sure, they care about their company and customers, their vendors and suppliers. But most importantly, they care to an exceptional degree about the people who work for them.

Article discusses the following 10 things:

  1. Autonomy and independence.
  2. Clear expectations.
  3. Meaningful objectives.
  4. A true sense of purpose.
  5. Opportunities to provide significant input.
  6. A real sense of connection.
  7. Reliable consistency.
  8. Private criticism.
  9. Pubic praise.
  10. A chance for a meaningful future.

via 10 Things Extraordinary Bosses Give Employees | Inc.com.

7 Tips for Creating a Social Workplace | Mashable


Each year, reports on employee dissatisfaction show workplace issues cause workers to feel stressed and undervalued. According to a survey by the American Psychological Association, employee dissatisfaction is often related to employer issues. 43% cite lack of opportunities for growth and advancement. 43% say a heavy workload leads to stress. 40% point to unrealistic job expectations. 39% bemoan long hours.

Creating a more social workplace may be the solution. Opportunities for teamwork and collaboration can help employees stop seeing themselves as individual task-doers and start seeing themselves as valuable team members, leading to a boost in employee morale and, ultimately, motivation and productivity.

Here are seven tips for eliminating employee dissatisfaction and creating a more social workplace:

1. Provide Workplace Perks
2. Offer Opportunities to Collaborate
3. Create Online Communities
4. Allow Growth From Within
5. Recognize Everyone, Not Just Star Players
6. Focus on Outplacement Services
7. Keep in Touch With Worker Needs

Read the full story: 7 Tips for Creating a Social Workplace | Mashable.