A Glimpse Inside the Hidden Vault Where Harvard Keeps Millions of Books | Gizmodo #libraries



Harvard’s flagship library, Widener, is an imposing granite cube built quite literally as shrine to the book. A central alcove cuts through the stacks to show off a prized relic: an original Gutenberg bible. But this is not the heart of Harvard’s libraries. No, that would be its cold storage site, an anonymous concrete building few students or even faculty know about.

The Harvard Depository, some 30 miles from the Cambridge campus, better resembles an Amazon warehouse than a library. The 200,000 square foot facility houses the vast majority of Harvard Library’s collection—some 9 million books, films, LPs, magnetic tapes, and pamphlets sorted not by the Dewey decimal system but by size.

A fascinating new interactive documentary, Cold Storage, glimpses inside this little-known world.

READ MORE: A Glimpse Inside the Hidden Vault Where Harvard Keeps Millions of Books | Gizmodo

Sony Crams 3,700 Blu-Rays’ Worth of Storage in a Single Cassette Tape | Gizmodo


Sony just unveiled tape that holds a whopping 148 GB per square inch, meaning a cassette could hold 185 TB of data. Prepare for the mixtape to end all mix tapes. Read more: Sony Crams 3,700 Blu-Rays’ Worth of Storage in a Single Cassette Tape  | Gizmodo

Digital Data Finds an Ancient Abode in DNA | Information Space


In 2012, scientists achieved an engineering feat which combined billions of years of development by nature and the next generation of bio-engineering, opening the gate to a new frontier of bleeding edge data storage technology.

This new data storage solution is encoding DNA to store digital data that can hold millions of gigabytes of data for thousands of years without any power. Researchers, since then, have sought means to code DNA like a data storage device and the results of these works have been nothing short of ground-breaking. After all, DNA is nature’s storage device, replicating and propagating genetic code over thousands of generations.

via Digital Data Finds an Ancient Abode in DNA | Information Space