First-ever Tor node in a Canadian library | Boing Boing #privacy #libraries #intellectualfreedom #rights #censorship #anonymity #Internet #Canada


Library workers at Western University’s Graduate Resource Centre in London, Ontario, had a workshop from Alison Macrina, the library organiser whose Library Freedom Project won a battle with the US DHS over a library in New Hampshire that was offering a Tor exit node as part of a global network that delivers privacy, censorship resistance, and anonymity to all comers. Western’s librarians were so taken by Macrina’s presentation that they’ve turned on Canada’s first library-based Tor node. There is no clear law in Canada about libraries and Tor, and Macrina and the Western library folks say they’re spoiling for a fight. READ: First-ever Tor node in a Canadian library | Boing Boing

Library’s Tor relay—Which Had Been Pulled After Feds Noticed—Now Restored | Ars Technica #libraries #government #intellectualfreedom


Homeland Security “does not make policy determinations for local communities.” READ MORE: Library’s Tor relay—which had been pulled after feds noticed—now restored | Ars Technica

Related: U.S. #DHS and Local #Governments Cracking Down on #Libraries | #email #privacy #intellectualfreedom #community #LittleFreeLibrary #WTF

Secure OS Tails Emerges From Beta | PCMag.com


If you want to give super-secure, relatively anonymous computing a shot, then the operating system used by famed NSA leaker Edward Snowden might be for you. The Amnesic Incognito Live System, otherwise known as Tails, has officially jumped out of beta and into version 1.0.

Read more: Secure OS Tails Emerges From Beta | News & Opinion | PCMag.com.

The Ultimate Guide to the Invisible Web | OEDB.org


Search engines are, in a sense, the heartbeat of the internet; “googling” has become a part of everyday speech and is even recognized by Merriam-Webster as a grammatically correct verb. It’s a common misconception, however, that googling a search term will reveal every site out there that addresses your search. In fact, typical search engines like Google, Yahoo, or Bing actually access only a tiny fraction – estimated at 0.03% – of the internet. The sites that traditional searches yield are part of what’s known as the Surface Web, which is comprised of indexed pages that a search engine’s web crawlers are programmed to retrieve.

So where’s the rest? The vast majority of the Internet lies in the Deep Web, sometimes referred to as the Invisible Web. The actual size of the Deep Web is impossible to measure, but many experts estimate it is about 500 times the size of the web as we know it.

Deep Web pages operate just like any other site online, but they are constructed so that their existence is invisible to Web crawlers. While recent news, such as the bust of the infamous Silk Road drug-dealing site and Edward Snowden’s NSA shenanigans, have spotlighted the Deep Web’s existence, it’s still largely misunderstood.

Read more: The Ultimate Guide to the Invisible Web | OEDB.org.

Eye-opening and informative post. Topics discussed:

  • Search Engines and the Surface Web
  • How is the Deep Web Invisible to Search Engines?
  • How to Access and Search for Invisible Content
  • Invisible Web Search Tools