How Google’s search algorithm spreads false information with rightwing bias | Guardian #search #autocomplete #Google #algorithms #language #racism #bias @Google


Google’s search algorithm appears to be systematically promoting information that is either false or slanted with an extreme rightwing bias on subjects as varied as climate change and homosexuality.

Following a recent investigation by the Observer, which found that Google’s search engine prominently suggests neo-Nazi websites and antisemitic writing, the Guardian has uncovered a dozen additional examples of biased search results. READ MORE: How Google’s search algorithm spreads false information with a rightwing bias | Technology | The Guardian

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Andreas Ekström: The Moral #Bias Behind Your #Search Results | TED.com #searchengines #tech #algorithms


Search engines have become our most trusted sources of information and arbiters of truth. But can we ever get an unbiased search result? Swedish author and journalist Andreas Ekström argues that such a thing is a philosophical impossibility. In this thoughtful talk, he calls on us to strengthen the bonds between technology and the humanities, and he reminds us that behind every algorithm is a set of personal beliefs that no code can ever completely eradicate.

#Google Turning Its Lucrative #Web #Search Over to #AI Machines | Bloomberg #tech #machinelearning #searchengines #algorithms #informationretrieval


For the past few months, a “very large fraction” of the millions of queries a second that people type into the company’s search engine have been interpreted by an artificial intelligence system, nicknamed RankBrain, said Greg Corrado, a senior research scientist with the company, outlining for the first time the emerging role of AI in search. RankBrain uses artificial intelligence to embed vast amounts of written language into mathematical entities — called vectors — that the computer can understand. If RankBrain sees a word or phrase it isn’t familiar with, the machine can make a guess as to what words or phrases might have a similar meaning and filter the result accordingly, making it more effective at handling never-before-seen search queries. READ MORE: Google Turning Its Lucrative Web Search Over to AI Machines | Bloomberg

B.C. Court of Appeal Upholds Global Deletion Order Against @Google | Michael Geist #search


The B.C. Court of Appeal has released its decision in Equustek Solutions Inc. v. Jack, a closely watched case involving a court order requiring Google to remove websites from its global index. As I noted in a post on the lower court decision, rather than ordering the company to remove certain links from the search results available through Google.ca, the order intentionally targets the entire database, requiring the company to ensure that no one, anywhere in the world, can see the search results.

READ MORE: B.C. Court of Appeal Upholds Global Deletion Order Against Google | Michael Geist

This Clever Image Search Could Change The Way You Find Pictures Online | Gizmodo


This Clever Image Search Could Change The Way You Find Pictures Online

Compared to searching for text, searching for images is super hard. But a new way to index and navigate through averaged images—those blurry composites that pull together millions of images into one—could radically change the way that we search for photos or products online.

READ MORE: This Clever Image Search Could Change The Way You Find Pictures Online | Gizmodo

Cheetyr is a Searchable Shortcut Cheat Sheet for Designers and Devs | LifeHacker


If youre a regular user of Photoshop, Illustrator, or do general web development, you probably find yourself drowning in a flood of keyboard shortcuts. Cheetyr helps make sense of them with a searchable database of keyboard shortcuts for several common apps and services. Currently, Cheetyr contains shortcuts for Photoshop, Illustrator, CSS, Git, and Vim. The site is accepting submissions and assistance, so the database is likely to grow over time. You can search for any function in the search box for each product to find the shortcut youre looking for.

via Cheetyr is a Searchable Shortcut Cheat Sheet for Designers and Devs | LifeHacker

SlideRule Searches for the Best Online Courses in Any Category | LifeHacker


Online classes are a great way to learn new skills. SlideRule makes your search easier by letting you browse and search through over 17,000 online courses. READ: SlideRule Searches for the Best Online Courses in Any Category | LifeHacker

And The Winner Of TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2014 Is… Vurb | TechCrunch


And The Winner Of TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2014 Is… Vurb | TechCrunch

Vurb is a web and mobile contextual search engine. When you type a query in Vurb, you get everything you need without having to leave the search engine. The company is rolling out search for Places, Movies, and Media. It will soon launch search for add People, Startups, and others. For example, if you search for a film, you get a trailer, showtimes, reviews, a link to watch the movie on Netflix, the IMDb score and more.

Read More: And The Winner Of TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2014 Is… Vurb | TechCrunch.

See also: Vurb’s Contextual Search Engine Blows Away Those Stupid Lists Of Links | TechCrunch

 

Make Google behave: techniques for better results | Karen Blakeman


This Grad Student Hacked Semantic Search To Be Better Than Google | Co.Labs


Full Post

Google may be the dominant search engine, but it’s far from ideal. One major problem: How do you search for things you don’t know exist?

Using Google’s own experimental algorithms, a graduate student may have build a solution: a search engine that allows you to add and subtract search terms for far more intuitive results.

The new search engine, ThisPlusThat.Me, similarly looks for context clues among the terms. For instance: Entering the arithmetic search “Paris – France + Italy” gives the top result as “Rome,” but if I search the same thing in Google, I’ll get directions between Paris and Italy, restaurants in France and Italy, and a depressing Yahoo Answers of whether Italy is in Paris (or vice versa). “Rome,” on the other hand, is an association you, a human, would make (I wantThis, without That but including Those)–and the engine makes that decision based on each answer’s semantic value compared to your search.

Until now, search has been stuck in a paradigm of literal matching, unable to break into conceptual associations and guessing what you mean when you search. There’s a reason Amazon and Netflix have scored points for their item suggestions: They’re thinking how you think.

The engine, created by Astrophysics PhD candidate Christopher Moody, uses Google’s own open-source word2vec algorithm research to take the terms you searched for and ranks the query results by relevance, just like a normal search–except the rankings are based on “vector distances” that have a lot more human sense. So in the above example, other results could have been, say, Napoleon or wine–both have ties with the above search terms, but within the context of City – Country + Other Country, Rome is the vector that has the closest “distance.”

All the word2vec algorithm needs is an appropriate corpus of data to build its word relations on: Moody used Wikipedia’s corpus as a vocabulary and relational base–an obvious advantage in size, but it also had the added benefit of “canonicalizing” terms (is it Paris the city, or Paris from the Trojan War? In Wikipedia, the first is “Paris” and the second “Paris_(mythology).” But millions of search-and-replaces in Wiki’s 42 GB of text was intensive, so Moody used Hadoop’s Map functions to fan those search-and-replaces to several nodes.

A search query then spits out an 8 GB table of vectors with varying distances; Moody tried out a few data search systems before settling on Google’s Numexpr to find the term with the closest vector distance.

via This Grad Student Hacked Semantic Search To Be Better Than Google | Co.Labs | code + community.