CodeMade.io is a place to find open-source Internet of Things Inspiration | TNW #coding #opensource #IoT #tech #resources


CodeMade is a user-generated collection of (mostly) physical computing products, complete with links to their source code. Projects are grouped by category, and range from basic Arduino projects that anyone can grasp, to more sophisticated ones that use artificial intelligence and deep learning. This makes it trivially easy for a beginner to find a cool project and start building.These projects are sourced from a variety of sources (GitHub, Instructables, Make Magazine, LifeHacker), and are aggregated into collections. I suppose you can think of it as being a bit like Pinterest, but for nerds. READ MORE: CodeMade.io is a place to find open-source Internet of Things Inspiration | The Next Web

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32 #Makerspace and #Arduino Stories to Spark Your Imagination and #Creativity | #RaspberryPi #microcomputers #makerspaces #DIY #robotics


Makerspaces

  1. MakerBot Offers 3-D Printing Resources, Ebook for Educators | School Library Journal
  2. New Minecraft Mod Teaches You Code as You Play | WIRED
  3. A Kids’ Book Where Every Character Can Be 3-D Printed | WIRED
  4. 8 experiences you should try on Google Cardboard right now | CNET
  5. Documentary ‘Print the Legend’ Goes Inside the World of 3D Printing | Mashable
  6. BBC launches Technobabble tool for children to make their own games  | The Guardian Site is aimed at 7-14 year-old digital makers: ‘The only requirements are access to the web, a willingness to experiment and an idea’
  7. Animation Made Easy: The best tools for student projects, from stop motion to GIFs | School Library Journal | The Digital Shift
  8. Free Photo Editing Software Lets You Manipulate Objects in 3D | Reframe | Gizmodo
  9. Pixar’s Powerful 3D Rendering Software RenderMan Is Now Free to Use | LifeHacker
  10. 3D sketching system ‘revolutionizes’ design interaction and collaboration | KurzweilAI
    University of Montreal researchers present their Hyve-3D system at SIGGRAPH 2014 conference.
  11. Turn Your iPhone Into a Crappy 1985 Camcorder With This App | Gizmodo
  12. Researchers create a virtual screen with touchable objects | Engadget
  13. With the new 3Doodler pen, drawing in midair isn’t just make-believe | Mashable
  14. MIT unveils 3D printing with glass breakthrough | Mashable RELATED: MIT scientists make it easy to tweak designs for 3D printing | Engadget

Arduino & Robotics

  1. How to Make Your Own Homemade Clock That Isn’t a Bomb | WIRED
  2. This Arduino Basic Kit has everything a newbie maker could ask for | Engadget
    It’s easy to think about tinkering around with Arduino, but take more than 30 seconds to look at the platform, and suddenly it becomes daunting: not only do you need an Arduino itself, but to get started you need resisters, wires, LEDs, screens and a host of other components that are almost always sold separately. Have no fear, newbies: there’s a new Arduino Basic Kit in town, and it has all the spare parts a beginner could want.
  3. Acer’s Arduino-based Cloud Professor wants to get kids into the IoT | arstechnica
    Educational dev kit tries taking sting out of programming cloud-connected devices.
  4. Build Like Ahmed with These Awesome Electronics Projects | LifeHacker
  5. A Kit To Build Your Own Computer Controls | FastCompany
  6. This Tech Giant Taught 3,000 Kids to Build Robots in a Year | WIRED
  7. Skechers stitched the Simon memory game into its new kids’ sneakers | Engadget

Raspberry Pi & Microcomputers

  1. Raspberry, Shmazberry, There’s A $15 Single Board Computer Called The Orange Pi | TechCrunch
  2. Raspberry Pi gets an official touchscreen display | Engadget
  3. Seven Ready-Made Raspberry Pi Projects You Can Install in a Few Clicks | LifeHacker
  4. RetroPie 3 Lets You Play Old Games On Your New Pi | TechCrunch
  5. Now Kids Can Build Their Own HD Display With The Kano Screen Kit | TechCrunch
    Kano‘s crazy cool educational PC is about to get a bit more visual. Kano CEO Alex Klein tweeted out that the company has launched a pre-order for an HD display kit. The Raspberry Pi based platform is a great, affordable way to show kids some of the bare basics of computers and is a great DIY project for hobbyists as well.
  6. The BBC Is Giving Away 1 Million Hacking Kits To Kids | FastCompany
    This fall, every 11- and 12-year-old school kid in the U.K. will be given a BBC Micro:bit, a tiny pocket-sized computer with no screen, no keyboard, nothing that most people would recognize as a computer. Until you program it, it sits there as dead as a circuit board ripped from any other electronic device. But hook it up to the world with clips and cables and sprinkle on a little code and it can turn into a guitar, an automatic plant-waterer, a loudspeaker, a games console, or almost anything a kid can dream up.
  7. This Tiny Computer Stacks Into a Colorful Lego Brick | Gizmodo
  8. Build an Automated Birdwatching Camera with a Raspberry Pi | LifeHacker
    If you have a birdhouse in your yard, you could spend days sitting around with binoculars waiting to see what cool little inhabitants come by. Or you can take Instructables user Sebelectronique’s lead and build a Raspberry Pi-powered camera inside a birdhouse. RELATED: Teach Kids Tech And Life With A Pi-Powered DIY Camera Trap | TechCrunch
  9. Back Up And Sync Your Files Inside A Mason Jar With Raspberry Preserve | TechCrunch
    An innovative DIYer has figured out a way to skillfully merge a Raspberry Pi running BitTorrent Sync with a traditional glass Mason jar. The result is a homemade service that keeps files in sync between all of your devices.

13 #Ideas in #Fashion and #Interactive #Tech #Wearables


Beyond Wearables: New Frontiers in Interactive Tech | WIRED
IN THE FINAL months of 2014, wearable technology sparked significant media and consumer attention – not least thanks to the announcement of the Apple Watch. But as wearables move from the margins into the mainstream, it’s time to consider the next wave of interactive technology.

Programmable Clothes Are Going Commercial | Co.Design
Clothes speak volumes about us, conveying messages about wealth, taste, and personal beliefs. So in this age of ubiquitous screens and social sharing, it’s no surprise that textiles have become another platform for electronic communication. But two new efforts are commercializing the technology, creating consumer fashions that allow the wearer to project any electronic text or image she desires.


Somehow Teen Girls Get the Coolest Wearable Out There | WIRED

JEWELBOTS ARE BRACELETS with programmable plastic flowers made for middle-school girls. They’re also the most interesting wearable I’ve seen this year. Their creators describe them as “friendships bracelets that teach girls to code.”


This Jacket Is a Dream Come True and I Need It Now | Jezebel

The BauBax jacket—which CNN quite accurately refers to as “the Swiss Army knife of
travel wear”—which debuted on Kickstarter last week with a goal of raising $20,000. They have since raised over $600,000 because it is a stunningly good idea. The jacket contains 15 pockets and a slew of built-in doodads.

These Strange Clothes Came Out of a Regular Old 3-D Printer | WIRED
Paired with new cellular structures being devised by 3-D printing re
searchers, the material allowed Peleg to create “lace-like textiles” that she could work with
“just like cloth.” She printed them using a Witbox—a $1,800 machine. [Image: Danit Peleg]Somehow Teen Girls Get the Coolest Wearable Out There | WIRED

These Mathematical Scarves Are Designed By a Computer Algorithm | Gizmodo
It’s still summer, but these mathematical merino scarves designed with a computer algorithm are getting us in the mood for colder temps. They’re called KnitYak: black-and-white merino scarves that each have a snowflake-unique design that’s generated by a computer algorithm.

A Paper-Thin Solar Panel Can Charge Your Phone on the Go | Lifehacker
Solar panels keep getting lighter and tinier—good news for rugged on-the-go types who can charge their devices on the trail with sun-fueled chargers. And this particular solar charger on Kickstarter is so thin, you can slip it in your Lonely Planet while it feeds your phone battery.

Disney’s $1 Billion Bet on a Magical Wristband | WIRED
The MagicBands look like simple, stylish rubber wristbands offered in cheery shades of grey, blue, green, pink, yellow, orange and red. Inside each is an RFID chip and a radio like those in a 2.4-GHz cordless phone. The wristband has enough battery to last two years. It may look unpretentious, but the band connects you to a vast and powerful system of sensors within the park.

New Process Can Print Stretchy Electronics Onto Your Clothes | TechCrunch
Researchers at the University of Tokyo have created a single-step process to print conductive material on cloth, allowing manufacturers to build stretchable wearables that can test vital signs like heart rate and muscle contraction.

Google’s Project Jacquard Aims To Make “Activewear” A Reality | ReadWriteWeb
What’s really fascinating about Project Jacquard…the clothing itself ought to be an interactive thing. It ought to provide us an opportunity to interact with devices around us. That’s the breakthrough that Project Jacquard is really talking about—now, instead of just passive data collection, your clothing is an opportunity for you to interact with devices.


Sensory Fiction | Felix | VIMEO

Sensory fiction is about new ways of experiencing and creating stories. Traditionally, fiction creates and induces emotions and empathy through words and images. By using a combination of networked sensors and actuators, the Sensory Fiction author is provided with new means of conveying plot, mood, and emotion while still allowing space for the reader’s imagination.


How to Print a Super-Thin Touchscreen Display on Just About Anything | Gizmodo

[T]his award-winning paper is perhaps the coolest we’ve seen: It lays out a new technique for printing cheap, simple touchscreen displays with conventional printers. It’s called PrintScreen, and it’s a system that allows the user to print on nearly a
ny material.

From The Designers Of Fitbit, A Digital Tattoo Implanted Under Your Skin | Co.Design
We asked NewDealDesign, the design consultancy behind projects like the Fitbit line of activity trackers, and Google’s modular Project Ara smartphone, what things might look like when technology and fashion reach beyond the wrist. In response, they created Project Underskin. It’s a concept for a smart digital tattoo which would be implanted in your hand and interact with everything you touch. It can unlock your front door, trade data with a handshake, or even tell you if you have low blood sugar.

Related

Et tu, Watson? IBM’s Supercomputer Can Critique Your #Writing | Engadget #tech #IBMWatson


It’s bad enough that robots are writing professionally (albeit badly), but now they’re criticizing, too? IBM has unveiled the Watson Tone Analyzer, the latest tool in its “cognitive computing” suite of cooking, health, shopping and other apps. Once you input a piece of text, the system will perform a “tone check” to analyze three different aspects of it: emotional, social and writing style. Each of those is divided into further categories — for instance, it can tell you if your writing style is confident or tentative, and whether the emotional tone is cheerful, angry or negative. From there, it can give you a breakdown of the overall tone and suggest new words to “fix” it. READ MORE: Et tu, Watson? IBM’s supercomputer can critique your writing | Engadget

Related

At last, the Raspberry Pi Mini PC Has An Official Case | Engadget #RaspberryPi #tech


There’s no question that the Raspberry Pi is successful among the homebrew computing crowd. However, it’s not what you’d call consumer-friendly — the bare circuit board you normally get is clearly intended for tinkerers who plan to put the mini PC inside their own projects. Mercifully, you won’t have to devise a shell for it (or run it exposed) for much longer. READ MORE: At last, the Raspberry Pi mini PC has an official case | Engadget

Raspberry Pi 2 runs free Windows 10, costs $35 | CNET


Microcomputing fans take note — there’s a new Raspberry Pi in town. The all-new board brings a host of new hardware, including a Broadcom 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 processor and 1GB of RAM. Those upgrades, the Raspberry Pi Foundation says, make the Pi 2 Model B a much more powerful computer — not just a good computer for its $35 price.

The Raspberry Pi is an extremely simple computer that can be yours for very little money. It looks and feels very basic, but can be built into any number of geeky projects, and is designed to get youngsters interested in coding…

…Raspberry Pi is on a collision course with Microsoft’s upcoming Windows 10 operating system. “For the last six months,” the Raspberry Pi Foundation writes on its blog, “we’ve been working closely with Microsoft to bring the forthcoming Windows 10 to Raspberry Pi 2. Microsoft will have much more to share over the coming months. The Raspberry Pi 2-compatible version of Windows 10 will be available free of charge to makers.”

READ MORE: Raspberry Pi 2 runs free Windows 10, costs $35 | CNET.

Indulge Your Inner Child and Lose a Few Hours To This Online Spirograph | Gizmodo


We’ve got computer graphics software thats so powerful it can generate images that make it seem like dinosaurs are back. But they still cant compare to the simple satisfaction you get from making a really complex hypotrochoid or epitrochoid with a marker and some perforated gears. So Nathan Friend was kind enough to build a browser-based Spirograph youre probably going to want to immediately bookmark.

The online Inspirograph, as Nathan calls it, lets you swap in gears of different sizes and choose pretty much any color your computers screen can display. And while you dont get that highly satisfying feeling of pen on paper as you make endless loops, its impossible to screw up your design on this version, unless you accidentally refresh the page.

via Indulge Your Inner Child and Lose a Few Hours To This Online Spirograph | Gizmodo

Why The Rubiks Cube Fascinates Designers | Co.Design


Why The Rubiks Cube Fascinates Designers | Co.Design | business + design

GOOGLES RUBIKS CUBE ISNT JUST A COOL GAME: ITS AN ARGUMENT FOR THE FUTURE OF COMPUTING. Read More: Why The Rubiks Cube Fascinates Designers | Co.Design | business + design.