CodeMade.io is a place to find open-source Internet of Things Inspiration | TNW #coding #opensource #IoT #tech #resources


CodeMade is a user-generated collection of (mostly) physical computing products, complete with links to their source code. Projects are grouped by category, and range from basic Arduino projects that anyone can grasp, to more sophisticated ones that use artificial intelligence and deep learning. This makes it trivially easy for a beginner to find a cool project and start building.These projects are sourced from a variety of sources (GitHub, Instructables, Make Magazine, LifeHacker), and are aggregated into collections. I suppose you can think of it as being a bit like Pinterest, but for nerds. READ MORE: CodeMade.io is a place to find open-source Internet of Things Inspiration | The Next Web

32 #Makerspace and #Arduino Stories to Spark Your Imagination and #Creativity | #RaspberryPi #microcomputers #makerspaces #DIY #robotics


Makerspaces

  1. MakerBot Offers 3-D Printing Resources, Ebook for Educators | School Library Journal
  2. New Minecraft Mod Teaches You Code as You Play | WIRED
  3. A Kids’ Book Where Every Character Can Be 3-D Printed | WIRED
  4. 8 experiences you should try on Google Cardboard right now | CNET
  5. Documentary ‘Print the Legend’ Goes Inside the World of 3D Printing | Mashable
  6. BBC launches Technobabble tool for children to make their own games  | The Guardian Site is aimed at 7-14 year-old digital makers: ‘The only requirements are access to the web, a willingness to experiment and an idea’
  7. Animation Made Easy: The best tools for student projects, from stop motion to GIFs | School Library Journal | The Digital Shift
  8. Free Photo Editing Software Lets You Manipulate Objects in 3D | Reframe | Gizmodo
  9. Pixar’s Powerful 3D Rendering Software RenderMan Is Now Free to Use | LifeHacker
  10. 3D sketching system ‘revolutionizes’ design interaction and collaboration | KurzweilAI
    University of Montreal researchers present their Hyve-3D system at SIGGRAPH 2014 conference.
  11. Turn Your iPhone Into a Crappy 1985 Camcorder With This App | Gizmodo
  12. Researchers create a virtual screen with touchable objects | Engadget
  13. With the new 3Doodler pen, drawing in midair isn’t just make-believe | Mashable
  14. MIT unveils 3D printing with glass breakthrough | Mashable RELATED: MIT scientists make it easy to tweak designs for 3D printing | Engadget

Arduino & Robotics

  1. How to Make Your Own Homemade Clock That Isn’t a Bomb | WIRED
  2. This Arduino Basic Kit has everything a newbie maker could ask for | Engadget
    It’s easy to think about tinkering around with Arduino, but take more than 30 seconds to look at the platform, and suddenly it becomes daunting: not only do you need an Arduino itself, but to get started you need resisters, wires, LEDs, screens and a host of other components that are almost always sold separately. Have no fear, newbies: there’s a new Arduino Basic Kit in town, and it has all the spare parts a beginner could want.
  3. Acer’s Arduino-based Cloud Professor wants to get kids into the IoT | arstechnica
    Educational dev kit tries taking sting out of programming cloud-connected devices.
  4. Build Like Ahmed with These Awesome Electronics Projects | LifeHacker
  5. A Kit To Build Your Own Computer Controls | FastCompany
  6. This Tech Giant Taught 3,000 Kids to Build Robots in a Year | WIRED
  7. Skechers stitched the Simon memory game into its new kids’ sneakers | Engadget

Raspberry Pi & Microcomputers

  1. Raspberry, Shmazberry, There’s A $15 Single Board Computer Called The Orange Pi | TechCrunch
  2. Raspberry Pi gets an official touchscreen display | Engadget
  3. Seven Ready-Made Raspberry Pi Projects You Can Install in a Few Clicks | LifeHacker
  4. RetroPie 3 Lets You Play Old Games On Your New Pi | TechCrunch
  5. Now Kids Can Build Their Own HD Display With The Kano Screen Kit | TechCrunch
    Kano‘s crazy cool educational PC is about to get a bit more visual. Kano CEO Alex Klein tweeted out that the company has launched a pre-order for an HD display kit. The Raspberry Pi based platform is a great, affordable way to show kids some of the bare basics of computers and is a great DIY project for hobbyists as well.
  6. The BBC Is Giving Away 1 Million Hacking Kits To Kids | FastCompany
    This fall, every 11- and 12-year-old school kid in the U.K. will be given a BBC Micro:bit, a tiny pocket-sized computer with no screen, no keyboard, nothing that most people would recognize as a computer. Until you program it, it sits there as dead as a circuit board ripped from any other electronic device. But hook it up to the world with clips and cables and sprinkle on a little code and it can turn into a guitar, an automatic plant-waterer, a loudspeaker, a games console, or almost anything a kid can dream up.
  7. This Tiny Computer Stacks Into a Colorful Lego Brick | Gizmodo
  8. Build an Automated Birdwatching Camera with a Raspberry Pi | LifeHacker
    If you have a birdhouse in your yard, you could spend days sitting around with binoculars waiting to see what cool little inhabitants come by. Or you can take Instructables user Sebelectronique’s lead and build a Raspberry Pi-powered camera inside a birdhouse. RELATED: Teach Kids Tech And Life With A Pi-Powered DIY Camera Trap | TechCrunch
  9. Back Up And Sync Your Files Inside A Mason Jar With Raspberry Preserve | TechCrunch
    An innovative DIYer has figured out a way to skillfully merge a Raspberry Pi running BitTorrent Sync with a traditional glass Mason jar. The result is a homemade service that keeps files in sync between all of your devices.

C.H.I.P. — The super tiny computer that only costs $9 [@Kickstarter] | Mashable #makerspaces @nextthingco



If you thought the $35 Raspberry Pi 2 was a small and cheap computer, think again. Next Thing Co.’s open-source C.H.I.P. is an even smaller barebones microcomputer that only costs $9.

Like the Raspberry Pi, C.H.I.P. can be used in a variety of ways. Connect the necessary parts — a keyboard, mouse, and a display — to it and it becomes a personal computer. Otherwise, you can hack it into a retro games emulator, or robot, or whatever you can dream up. Next Thing Co. encourages users to learn how to code and make things with C.H.I.P.

Next Thing Co. is currently crowdfunding C.H.I.P. through a Kickstarter campaign. At the time of this writing, the project has successfully reached its $50,000 funding goal with 29 days to go. The first C.H.I.P computers are expected to start shipping in December.

READ MORE: C.H.I.P. — the super tiny computer that only costs $9 | Mashable

BBC Micro Bit Will Complement Raspberry Pi Not Compete With It | The Guardian


BBC Micro Bit will complement Raspberry Pi not compete with it | Technology | The Guardian

The BBC’s new Micro Bit programmable device is designed to complement computers like the Raspberry Pi rather than compete with them, according to people involved with the project.

The broadcaster is planning to give one million units of the device away in the autumn as part of its Make It Digital initiative, including one for every child in year seven of the British education system – ie 11-12 year-olds.

The BBC hopes that the Micro Bit will get children interested in programming in the same way that its BBC Micro computer did in the 1980s, although the new device is being pitched as a gateway to more complex computers.

READ MORE: BBC Micro Bit will complement Raspberry Pi not compete with it | Technology | The Guardian

Related Posts

Primo Is An Arduino Robot That Teaches Kids Programming Logic Through Play [Kickstarter] | TechCrunch


Dan Shapiro’s Robot Turtles board game Kickstarter showed there is serious appetite for kids’ games that aren’t just fun to play with but also sneakily teach core coding principles. Instead of the $25,000 he was aiming for, Shapiro raised more than $630,000. Geeky moms and dads clearly have money, and will spend it on the right bit of educational kit.

With that kind of Kickstarter community response, it’s pretty likely we’re set to see a wave of educational toys doing cool fun stuff with programming principles. To wit, meet Primo: a physical programming interface that teaches children programming logic while they control the movements of an Arduino-powered robot.

Read: Primo Is An Arduino Robot That Teaches Kids Programming Logic Through Play | TechCrunch.

Touch Board kit combines an Arduino heart with touch sensors, conductive paint | Engadget


Capacitive sensing isn’t limited to your smartphone. In fact, you can use contact with human skin (or any other conductive surface) to trigger almost any circuit. And the Touch Board from Bare Conductive wants you to combine your DIY spirit with the ability to turn practically any surface into a sensor. At the heart is an Arduino compatible microcontroller (based on the Leonardo) with a few extras baked in, including a Freescale touch sensor connected to 12 electrodes and an audio processor for triggering MIDI sounds or MP3 files. While you can simply trigger the electrodes by touching them or connecting them to any conductive material, such as a wire, the Electric Paint Pen really opens up the input possibilities. It’s just like a paint marker, often used for small scale graffiti, except it spits out conductive black ink that can turn a wall, a piece of paper or almost anything else into a trigger. In fact, it

TouchBoard

‘s preloaded with a bunch of sample sounds on a microSD card so that you can simply paint a soundboard out of the box.

Read more: Touch Board kit combines an Arduino heart with touch sensors, conductive paint.

Life with Raspberry Pi: Sparking a School Coding Revolution | The Digital Shift


Our classroom glows with activity. One kid drafts a how-to article in which he explains the steps involved in wiring a cardboard Minecraft controller. Another writes a branching-path, choose-your-own-adventure story in Twine, a free, downloadable interactive fiction app. A student who’s claimed throughout his middle-school career that he isn’t a writer leans close to his laptop screen, finding and fixing coding errors. He composes, compiles, and debugs more than 100 lines of code to light up a three-by-three-light LED display plugged into his laptop.

A pair of especially curious students sits huddled around our newest computer, an exposed-faced circuit board smaller than a paperback book. It’s called a Raspberry Pi. They’re watching how the code they write in one window changes the course of a game in another. They may not know it yet, but these kids are playing with an open-source computing platform that just might change the way we teach young people how to interact with computers.

Read: Life with Raspberry Pi: Sparking a School Coding Revolution | The Digital Shift.

Intel launches Galileo, an Arduino-compatible development board | Engadget


Notice how so many maker projects require open-source hardware like Arduino and Raspberry Pi to function? Intel has, and the company is leaping into bed with the former to produce the Galileo development board.

Read: Intel launches Galileo, an Arduino-compatible development board  | Engadget.

CodeBender.CC Makes It Crazy Easy To Program Your Arduino Board From Your Browser | TechCrunch


The official Arduino IDE is a dour piece of software designed for uploading code to the ubiquitous and super-cool micro controller. It is a standalone, non-networked app that isn’t very pretty to look at. But what if you want to share code and upload programs right from your browser? That’s where CodeBender.cc comes in.

CodeBender is a browser-based IDE that supports uploading to nearly any Arduino board. You can use the program to copy sample code, browse code uploaded by other users, and even store private snippets. Because it is collaborative you can clone bits of code and use it in your own projects and there is even a curated list of cool snippets.

Full Post: CodeBender.CC Makes It Crazy Easy To Program Your Arduino Board From Your Browser | TechCrunch.

You may also like: 10 Arduino Projects That Blow Our Mind | Stephen’s Lighthouse | The Modern MLIS

10 Arduino Projects That Blow Our Mind | Stephen’s Lighthouse


 ”Arduino this, Arduino that. What is Arduino anyway? If you want the official definition from the Arduino website, it is “an open-source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. It’s intended for  artists, designers, hobbyists, and anyone interested in creating interactive objects or environments.” In layman’s terms, it’s a little board that you can use to create interactive stuff and connect it to sensors, lights, motors and other outputs.

via 10 Arduino Projects That Blow Our Mind | Stephen’s Lighthouse.

See also: Arduino.cc

New 10 Arduino Projects That Blow Our Mind – Stephen's Lighthouse

Photo Credit: Arduino Team

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