Neon is an experimental web browser that’s filled with glorious content bubbles | Mashable #webbrowsers #content #search #discovery


Image Source: Mashable/Opera

Opera, which released its first browser in 1995, has quietly been innovating its products over the last two decades with features like built in ad-blocking and VPN. Now, the company has launched Neon, a new concept browser.  REDA MORE: Neon is an experimental web browser that’s filled with glorious content bubbles

Library Extension Finds Books At Your Local Library While You Shop On Amazon | Lifehacker #books #libraries #tech #discovery #webbrowsers


Image Source: Lifehacker

Amazon may be convenient, but nothing beats free. So, when you’re shopping for books on the site, [Google Chrome] Library Extension will find those same books at your local library. You can even drive to pick them up faster than Amazon can ship them. READ MORE: Library Extension Finds Books At Your Local Library While You Shop On Amazon | Lifehacker

A browser for people who think Chrome is for dummies | CNET #Internet #browsers #interfaces #tools #tech #UX


Vivaldi 1.0, from the creators of Opera, is crammed with options for those of you who want to break out of the confines of ordinary browsers. READ MORE: A browser for people who think Chrome is for dummies | CNET

New MIT Code Makes Web Pages Load 34 Percent Faster in Any Browser | Gizmodo #Internet #browsers #broadband


Internet connections get faster but websites get more complex—and that means we often still have to wait an age for pages to load. Now, a new technique from MIT that helps browsers gather files more efficiently could change that. “As pages increase in complexity, they often require multiple trips that create delays that really add up,” explains Ravi Netravali, one of the researchers, in a press release. “Our approach minimizes the number of round trips so that we can substantially speed up a page’s load-time.” The new system, known as Polaris, was been developed by the University’s at Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. READ MORE: New MIT Code Makes Web Pages Load 34 Percent Faster in Any Browser | Gizmodo

See Book Availability from Your Local #Library while [ Web Browsing] | LibraryExtension.com #books #libraries #Internet #tools #browsers #catalogs


As you browse books and e-books on Amazon.com, the Library Extension checks your library’s online catalog and displays the availability of that item on the same page. If the book is available at your library, you’ll know instantly – with a quick, convenient link to reserve the title! READ MORE: Library Extension – See book availability from your local library while you browse Amazon.com | Library Extension for Chrome

Google wants you to download your web search history | Engadget #search


Wondering what you were searching for online a few years ago? You now have a (relatively) easy way to find out. Google has quietly trotted out an option to download your entire search history. So long as you searched using your Google account, you’ll have a permanent record.

via Google wants you to download your web search history | Engadget

Readlang Helps You Learn a Foreign Language as You Surf the Web | LifeHacker #language


The most effective way to learn a foreign language is to immerse yourself as much as possible in it. Readlang is a webapp and Chrome extension that helps you learn by translating web sites and creating flashcards and word lists for you. READ MORE: Readlang Helps You Learn a Foreign Language as You Surf the Web | LifeHacker

Over 2,400 MS-DOS Games — Like Oregon Trail — Can Now Be Played Online | BuzzFeed News


archive.org

Rejoice, ’90s kids: More than 2,400 of your favorite MS-DOS games are now available to play online via the Internet Archive. READ MORE: Over 2,400 MS-DOS Games — Like Oregon Trail — Can Now Be Played Online | BuzzFeed News.

Related
Internet Archive offers 900 classic arcade games for browser-based play | Ars Technica

Internet Archive offers 900 classic arcade games for browser-based play | Ars Technica


As part of its continuing mission to catalog and preserve our shared digital history, the Internet Archive has published a collection of more than 900 classic arcade games, playable directly in a Web browser via a Javascript emulator.

The Internet Arcade collects a wide selection of titles, both well-known and obscure, ranging from “bronze age” black-and-white classics like 1976s Sprint 2 up through the dawn of the early 90s fighting game boom in Street Fighter II. In the middle are a few historical oddities, such as foreign Donkey Kong bootleg Crazy Kong and the hacked “Pauline Edition” of Donkey Kong that was created by a doting father just last year.

READ MORE: Internet Archive offers 900 classic arcade games for browser-based play | Ars Technica.

Middle Earth comes to life in epic Chrome experiment | Engadget


We’re go out on a limb here and say that the Venn diagram of Engadget fans and Tolkien fans looks something like this. So, we figure you’ll probably want to hear about a brand new Chrome experiment that brings various parts of Middle Earth to life, including the Trollshaw and Dol Guldur. It starts with a pretty simple interactive map, but from there you’re able to dive into several locations and learn about Hobbit lore through text, animations and audio. At the end of each lesson on Tolkien’s fantasy world, you’re challenged to complete a simple mini game that has you causing flowers to bloom or avoiding troll attacks. While the WebGL-powered games are pretty impressive, its the HTML5 audio and animations that are the real eye-candy here — doubly so since they work just as well on a phone or tablet as they do your desktop. As you swipe through slides in the story, camera angles change in coordination with your finger and characters dart across bridges. Honestly, even if you’re part of that tiny sliver in the diagram that can’t stand Tolkien, it’s worth checking out the latest Chrome Experiment, if only to remind yourself of the growing power of the web browser.

Middle Earth comes to life in epic Chrome experiment | Engadget