Discover “Unpaywall,” a New (and Legal) Browser Extension That Lets You Read Millions of Science Articles…Behind Paywalls | Open Culture #research #publications #openaccess #science #academics


While many science publishers put a paywall in front of scientific articles, it’s often the case that these articles have been published elsewhere in an open format. “More and more funders and universities are requiring authors to upload copies of their papers to [open] repositories. This has created a deep resource of legal open access papers…” And that’s what Unpaywall draws on. READ MORE: Discover “Unpaywall,” a New (and Legal) Browser Extension That Lets You Read Millions of Science Articles Normally Locked Up Behind Paywalls | Open Culture

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IBM Now Letting Anyone Play With Its Quantum Computer | WIRED #tech #remote #quantumcomputing #online #openaccess @IBM


Quantum computing is computing at its most esoteric. It’s an experimental, enormously complex, sometimes downright confusing technology that’s typically the domain of hardcore academics and organizations like Google and NASA. But that might be changing.

Today, IBM unveiled an online service that lets anyone use the five-qubit quantum computer its researchers have erected at a research lab in Yorktown Heights, New York. You can access the machine over the Internet via a simple software interface—or at least it’s simple if you understand the basics of quantum computing. READ MORE: IBM Is Now Letting Anyone Play With Its Quantum Computer | WIRED

125 MOOCs Getting Started in May: Enroll in One Today | Open Culture #MOOCs


MORE: 125 MOOCs Getting Started in May: Enroll in One Today | Open Culture

The US is opening up the Smithsonian’s digitized art collection | Engadget


The White House promised that it would open up government data last year, and it’s now expanding those plans in some intriguing directions. For one, it’s opening up the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s digitized collection; you’ll soon get to build apps and other tools using the institution’s artwork as a foundation. Even curators don’t have that much access right now, the administration says. via The US is opening up the Smithsonian’s digitized art collection | Engadget

From the White House Continued Progress and Plans for Open Government Data:

  • Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection: The Smithsonian American Art Museum’s entire digitized collection will be opened to software developers to make educational apps and tools. Today, even museum curators do not have easily accessible information about their art collections. This information will soon be available to everyone.

77,000 Images of Tapestries and Italian Monuments Join the Open Content Program | The Getty Iris


The Getty Research Institute has just added more than 77,000 high-resolution images to the Open Content Program from two of its most often-used collections.

The largest part of the new open content release—more than 72,000 photographs—comes from the collection Foto Arte Minore: Max Hutzel photographs of art and architecture in Italy. Foto Arte Minore represents the life’s work of photographer and scholar Max Hutzel (1911–1988), who photographed the art and architecture of Italy for 30 years. In recent years, the interdisciplinary use of these photographs has exposed their historiographic significance and their unrealized research potential.

Read more: 77,000 Images of Tapestries and Italian Monuments Join the Open Content Program | The Getty Iris.

10 OpenCourseWare Sites for a Free Education | Mashable


See the full article: 10 OpenCourseWare Sites for a Free Education | Mashable.

  1. MIT
  2. OpenCourseWare Consortium
  3. Yale
  4. Open.Michigan
  5. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  6. Harvard Medical School
  7. Carnegie Mellon
  8. Tufts University
  9. Notre Dame
  10. UC Berkeley

Introducing the Mozilla Science Lab | The Mozilla Blog


We’re excited to announce the launch of the Mozilla Science Lab, a new initiative that will help researchers around the world use the open web to shape science’s future.

Scientists created the web — but the open web still hasn’t transformed scientific practice to the same extent we’ve seen in other areas like media, education and business. For all of the incredible discoveries of the last century, science is still largely rooted in the “analog” age. Credit systems in science are still largely based around “papers,” for example, and as a result researchers are often discouraged from sharing, learning, reusing, and adopting the type of open and collaborative learning that the web makes possible.

The Science Lab will foster dialog between the open web community and researchers to tackle this challenge. Together they’ll share ideas, tools, and best practices for using next-generation web solutions to solve real problems in science, and explore ways to make research more agile and collaborative.

via Introducing the Mozilla Science Lab | The Mozilla Blog

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7 Ways Librarians Can Participate in Open Access/Source/Education Communities – iLibrarian


“As a librarian I use a lot of information, software, and resources which are made available to me through creative commons licensing, open access repositories, and the open source community. If you’re like me and looking for ways to give back, here are a few ideas for ways you can contribute to these amazing communities.”

via 7 Ways Librarians Can Participate in Open Access/Open Source/Education Communities – iLibrarian.

Mashable | Free Database of the Entire Web May Spawn the Next Google


Common Crawl, and subsequent spin off projects, is an organization I believe librarians should be following closely. It would be great for library and information service professionals to be involved with some of these projects. I could also see the government and educational institutions providing funding for research proposals analyzing some of the data.

“A nonprofit called Common Crawl is now using its own web crawler and making a giant copy of the web that it makes accessible to anyone. The organization offers up more than 5 billion web pages, available for free so that researchers and entrepreneurs can try things otherwise possible only for those with access to resources on the scale of Google’s.”

via Mashable | Free Database of the Entire Web May Spawn the Next Google.

Major Ed-Tech Trends for 2013 – Online Colleges [Infographic]


via Major Ed-Tech Trends for 2013 – Online Colleges