CodeMade.io is a place to find open-source Internet of Things Inspiration | TNW #coding #opensource #IoT #tech #resources


CodeMade is a user-generated collection of (mostly) physical computing products, complete with links to their source code. Projects are grouped by category, and range from basic Arduino projects that anyone can grasp, to more sophisticated ones that use artificial intelligence and deep learning. This makes it trivially easy for a beginner to find a cool project and start building.These projects are sourced from a variety of sources (GitHub, Instructables, Make Magazine, LifeHacker), and are aggregated into collections. I suppose you can think of it as being a bit like Pinterest, but for nerds. READ MORE: CodeMade.io is a place to find open-source Internet of Things Inspiration | The Next Web

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MIT’s Amazing New #App Lets You Program Any Object | FastCompany #IoT #InternetofThings #tech #smarthome #AR #augmentedreality


The Reality Editor is a Minority Report style AR app that makes programming your smart home as easy as connecting the dots. READ MORE: MIT’s Amazing New App Lets You Program Any Object | FastCompany

Learn About the Internet of Things with This Interactive Visualization | LifeHacker #IoT #InternetofThings @infobeautiful


If you’re still trying to wrap your head around what the “Internet of Things” is, this data visualization makes things easy to understand and is fun to explore.

The visualization, from the team at Information is Beautiful, does a great job of explaining what the Internet of Things is, what it can and will affect, who the major players are, and even provides some eye-opening statistics regarding the direction we’re all headed with technology. Additionally, it mentions some of the challenges facing our “always connected” world. You can check it out at the link.

The Internet of Things | Information is Beautiful

via Learn About the Internet of Things with This Interactive Visualization | LifeHacker

The Next Big Thing In Design? Less Choice | Co.Design #design #tech


The article discusses the importance and applications of anticipatory design.

Technology has revolutionized the way we live our lives and do business, but it has done a terrible job reducing the stress of so many decisions. Industry by industry, great digital design has eliminated middlemen from the economy and put users in control, making it fast and easy for us to determine what we want and purchase it directly, whether on a computer or over a phone. Now, with unlimited opportunities for decision-making, we have essentially made ourselves the middlemen in our own lives.

The enjoyment, and even fetishization, of the beautifully designed experiences we rely on to make these decisions has distracted us from our original goal of simplifying our lives. We’ve forgotten that the ultimate purpose of an interface is to make things simpler. In the future, the best interface will be no interface at all and the best decisions will be made without me having to make them (but according to my preferences and goals). 

READ MORE: The Next Big Thing In Design? Less Choice | Co.Design | business + design

The 21 Coolest Internet Of Things Gadgets | Bernard Marr


Enter into the 4th Industrial Revolution | Dassault Systemes


The Internet Of Things Will Be Huge—Just Not As Huge As The Hype | ReadWrite


The Internet of Things promises to bring a new level of convenience to our lives. Could it bring trillions of dollars worth of convenience? Not likely, but that’s not stopping a lot of prognosticators out there.

The level of hype around the financial promise of the Internet of Things is truly gargantuan. A May 2013 report from the McKinsey Institute suggests that connecting billions of ordinary devices to the Internet will add between $2.7 trillion and $6.2 trillion a year to the global economy by 2025.

Cisco, which has a big stake in the hardware infrastructure for a thriving Internet of Things, estimates that what it calls “the Internet of Everything” will boost global output by $14.4 trillion over 9 years, or a comparatively sane $1.6 trillion a year. General Electric, by contrast, goes even bigger than McKinsey, and estimates that the “Industrial Internet” will boost global GDP by $15.3 trillion in 2030.

So where is all this money going to come from? Will all the little robots and sensors that will fill our lives with automated goodness also spit out gold coins? Not quite. But the Internet of Things is still going to add a lot of economic value. Even if actual gains only amount to a tenth of the hype, the potential boost to the economy—and human wellbeing in general—will be very significant.

Read the rest of the story: The Internet Of Things Will Be Huge—Just Not As Huge As The Hype | ReadWrite.

What’s Holding Up The Internet Of Things | ReadWrite


From June 2013. The article reviews the issues why the Internet of Things is not further along in actualization. The issues being protocols,  network architecture and the economics.

The Internet of Things – in which ordinary objects get smart and connected, making possible all sorts of new services – promises to give us smarter cities, fewer traffic jams, a cleaner environment and a Series victory for the Cubs. (OK, maybe not that last one.)

Trouble is, while lots of technologists and technophiles talk about the Internet of Things as if it were already here, there really isn’t any such thing. Not in any true sense of the term. Here’s why.

See the full story: What’s Holding Up The Internet Of Things | ReadWrite.

Wearable Computers Create New Security Vulnerabilities | Gadget Lab | Wired.com


Among other things, Google Glass is bringing to light how wearable computers and the new wave of web-connected objects collectively known as the Internet of Things are introducing new security vulnerabilities to the puzzle of mobile computing.

See the full article: Wearable Computers Create New Security Vulnerabilities | Gadget Lab | Wired.com.

The Future Of Technology Isn’t Mobile, It’s Contextual | Co.Design


Next up: Machines that understand you and everything you care about, anticipate your behavior and emotions, absorb your social graph, interpret your intentions, and make life, um, “easier.”

via The Future Of Technology Isn’t Mobile, It’s Contextual | Co.Design: business + innovation + design.