Robert Waldinger: What Makes a Good Life? Lessons from the Longest Study on #Happiness | TED.com #studies #lifestyle #wellness #relationships


What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it’s fame and money, you’re not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you’re mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life. MORE: Robert Waldinger: What Makes a Good Life? Lessons from the Longest Study on Happiness | TED.com

The Future Of #Museums Is Reaching Way Beyond Their Walls | Co.Exist #AMNH


The American Museum of Natural History has always been one of the most popular destinations in New York City. With about 5 million visitors a year, an increase from 3 million in the 1990s, it—along with the nearby Metropolitan Museum of Art—is among the top 10 most-visited museums in the world.

Even with this influx of people coming to its doorstep, however, the museum is now equally focused on drawing a crowd beyond its campus.

“In the old days, a visit to a museum like ours would be a one-off. You come, you visit you go home,” says Futter. “Now people have a relationships with us very often before they get here. They come, and [their visit] is like a giant exclamation point—and then they return home and continue to engage with us wherever they are.”

AMNH today is a sprawling outreach institution that is using apps, social media, and educational programs to slowly grow its reach. READ MORE: The Future Of Museums Is Reaching Way Beyond Their Walls | Co.Exist | ideas + impact.

Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic than Toughness | HBR #mentoring #emotionalintelligence


Very timely article on emotional intelligence and compassion in leadership. Well worth the read.

Stanford University neurosurgeon Dr. James Doty tells the story of performing surgery on a little boy’s brain tumor. In the middle of the procedure, the resident who is assisting him gets distracted and accidentally pierces a vein. With blood shedding everywhere, Doty is no longer able to see the delicate brain area he is working on. The boy’s life is at stake. Doty is left with no other choice than to blindly reaching into the affected area in the hopes of locating and clamping the vein. Fortunately, he is successful.

Most of us are not brain surgeons, but we certainly are all confronted with situations in which an employee makes a grave mistake, potentially ruining a critical project.

The question is:  How should we react when an employee is not performing well or makes a mistake?

Frustration is of course the natural response — and one we all can identify with. Especially if the mistake hurts an important project or reflects badly upon us.

The traditional approach is to reprimand the employee in some way. The hope is that some form of punishment will be beneficial: it will teach the employee a lesson. Expressing our frustration also may relieve us of the stress and anger caused by the mistake. Finally, it may help the rest of the team stay on their toes to avoid making future errors.

Some managers, however, choose a different response when confronted by an underperforming employee: compassion and curiosity.  Not that a part of them isn’t frustrated or exasperated — maybe they still worry about how their employee’s mistakes will reflect back on them — but they are somehow able to suspend judgment and may even be able to use the moment to do a bit of coaching.

What does research say is best? The more compassionate response will get you more powerful results.

READ MORE: Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic than Toughness | Harvard Business Review

8 Questions To Ask Your Boss That Can Make Or Break Your Career | Fast Company


Feedback from your supervisor is what you crave, unless you’re happy flying under the radar, which certainly won’t help you advance. Getting honest input from your supervisor is crucial to your relationship with your boss–and, like it or not, your relationship with your boss can make or break your career. A solid rapport makes deadlines a breeze and the workday go by in a flash; but a shaky one can render even a short elevator ride interminable.

Plus, having a good relationship with your boss may even reduce stress at work. In aworkplace study by the American Psychological Association, up to 75% of respondents said the most stressful aspect of their job is their immediate boss.

Here, we asked an expert to share a few key questions you can ask that will help you and your supervisor get on (or stay on) the right track.

Read: 8 Questions To Ask Your Boss That Can Make Or Break Your Career | Fast Company

Online Dating [Infographic], Online Dating & Relationships Report | Pew Research Center; How I Hacked Online Dating | Amy Webb | TED


Online Dating & Relationships | Pew Research Center

Overview
One in ten Americans have used an online dating site or mobile dating app; 66% of these online daters have gone on a date with someone they met through a dating site or app, and 23% have met a spouse or long term partner through these sites. Public attitudes toward online dating have become more positive in recent years, but many users also report negative experiences.

These are among the results of a national survey of dating and relationships in the digital era, the first dedicated study of this subject by the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project since 2005. Key findings include:

  • 11% of internet users (representing 9% of all American adults) say that they have personally used an online dating site. As recently as 2008, just 3% of American adults had used online dating sites.
  • 7% of cell phone apps users (representing 3% of all American adults) say that they have used a dating app on their cell phone.

Taken together, 11% of all American adults are “online daters”—meaning they have used a dating site or mobile dating app. Online dating is especially common among the college-educated and those in their mid-20’s through mid-40’s, and 38% of Americans who are currently single and actively looking for a partner have used online dating at one point or another. See the online report or download the pdf.

Amy Webb: How I hacked online dating | TED.com
Amy Webb was having no luck with online dating. The dates she liked didn’t write her back, and her own profile attracted crickets (and worse). So, as any fan of data would do: she started making a spreadsheet. Hear the story of how she went on to hack her online dating life — with frustrating, funny and life-changing results.

Online Dating [Infographic] | Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project

Dating Digitally: Pew

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Looking for literary love in London? | CSMonitor.com


Book review website the Omnivore has created a dating feature that matches participants based on answers to questions like ‘What are you currently reading?’ and ‘What author do you have a crush on?

via Looking for literary love in London? | CSMonitor.com.

The Omnivore Pin-up section on The Omnivore website.