This $169 Computer Is Designed For The World’s Emerging Middle Class | Co.Exist #computers


2 | This 9 Computer Is Designed For The World's Emerging Middle Class | Co.Exist | ideas + impact

On a trip to India, entrepreneur Matt Dalio noticed something about the country’s emerging middle class: While many families owned TVs, few could also afford to have a computer. He had an epiphany. Why not make TV screens double as the monitor for a low-cost, but fully-functioning PC?

For the next three years, he worked with a team to develop Endless, a $169 computer designed for the burgeoning middle class in the developing world. It’s loaded with around 150 apps—from health and farming to Wikipedia—that can work offline, so if someone has a spotty Wi-Fi connection, they can keep working.

READ MORE: This $169 Computer Is Designed For The World’s Emerging Middle Class | Co.Exist | ideas + impact.

E-Book Legal Restrictions Are Screwing Over Blind People | WIRED


Snip

…For the nearly 8 million people in the US with some degree of vision impairment, the advent of ebooks and e-readers has been both a blessing and a burden. A blessing, because a digital library—everything from academic textbooks, to venerated classics, to romance novels—is never further away than your fingertips. A burden, because the explosion of ebooks has served as a reminder of how inaccessible technology really can be…

READ MORE: E-Book Legal Restrictions Are Screwing Over Blind People | WIRED

Feeling Unsatisfied? Get Thee To A Library And Feel Like You Got A Raise | Co.Exist


How do you quantify a public good? Library supporters have struggled with this problem for a long time, as public libraries are often the first institutions up on a budget-slasher’s chopping block. But a recent study from the London School of Economics bolsters the value of libraries in a major way. By translating well-being gained from visits to the library into dollars, the study’s authors conclude that a year of library visits is equivalent to a little more than a $2,200 raise.

READ MORE: Feeling Unsatisfied? Get Thee To A Library And Feel Like You Got A Raise | Co.Exist | ideas + impact.

Comixology DRM-Free Comics | $1 for Access to 15,000 Marvel Comics | Gizmodo


You Can Finally Download DRM-Free Comic Book Backups From Comixology | Gizmodo
The biggest digital comic book distributor in all of digital comics land, Comixology, just took a relatively unprecedented move for a platform its size. Customers will now be able to download DRM-free backups—meaning when you buy a book, you’ll finally get to own it, too.

You Can Access 15,000 Marvel Comics Right Now For a Buck | Gizmodo
As we all prepare our brains and Twitter feeds for the unstoppable flood of comics and entertainment news that will pour out of San Diego Comic-Con, Marvel announced some news in the quiet before the storm. Now, for 99 cents, readers can gain access to Marvel Unlimited, the publisher’s treasure trove of 15,000 issues from current series (well, at least six months old) and classic golden- and silver-age titles. You can also store up to 12 issues offline so you can read without a reliable Wi-Fi connection. As long as you have a Mac, PC, iOS, or Android device, you’re in business.

 

Jaron Lanier Discusses Big Data, Privacy at NYPL LIVE Event | The Digital Shift


The original developers of network technology wanted to democratize access to information, but while networks have succeeded in improving access, the ways in which governments and corporations are now gathering and using personal data has been an unfortunate consequence, argued author and computer science pioneer Jaron Lanier during a LIVE from the New York Public Library (NYPL) event on October 10. In a wide-ranging interview with NYPL’s Director of Public Programs Paul Holdengräber, Lanier also discussed the role that libraries play as people find it increasingly difficult to keep information about themselves private.

Read the full story: Jaron Lanier Discusses Big Data, Privacy at NYPL LIVE Event | The Digital Shift.

More gadgets, more reading: Survey suggests e-reader and tablet owners read more books |gigaom


A new survey from USA Today and book discovery website Bookish finds that U.S. adults who own a tablet or e-reader read more books than the device-less. The survey also found differences in reading habits between adults under 40 and adults over 40.

Read: More gadgets, more reading: Survey suggests e-reader and tablet owners read more books | gigaom

See also: E-books are changing reading habits | USA Today

USA Today Survey

 

A Map of Internet Freedom Around the World | Gizmodo


Here in the US, it’s easy to slip into the comfortable idea that the internet is unrestricted, a home for free speech and exploration, whether it’s meaningful and important, or dumb hashtags. It’s not that way everywhere though, and Freedom House has mapped out the current state of affairs across the globe.

Read and see more charts:  A Map of Internet Freedom Around the World | Gizmodo

Freedom On The Net 2013

Download free copy of The Library Publishing Toolkit | Stephen’s Lighthouse


Download free copy of The Library Publishing Toolkit | Stephen’s Lighthouse

The Library Publishing Toolkit looks at the broad and varied landscape of library publishing through discussions, case studies, and shared resources. From supporting writers and authors in the public library setting to hosting open access journals and books, this collection examines opportunities for libraries to leverage their position and resources to create and provide access to content.

New Download free copy of The Library Publishing Toolkit – Stephen's Lighthouse

The Internet is Important to Everyone [Infographic] | OCLC WebJunction


The Internet is Important to Everyone | OCLC Web Junction

The Internet is Important to Everyone

The Power of eLearning…in the Library | Lumos Learning


The Power of eLearning…in the Library | Lumos Learning

7 Ways Libraries can Impact Student Learning