12-Year-Old Girl Got Higher #IQ Score than Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking | Mashable #girlpower #Mensa


Nicole Barr, a 12-year-old in Essex, London, just scored a 162 on her Mensa IQ test — that’s two points higher than Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking scored. READ MORE: A 12-year-old girl got a higher IQ score than Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking | Mashable

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30 Tips to Cultivate #SoftSkills in Your #Students | InformED #skills #education


Preparing students for successful careers is a major part of every educator’s job, but most preservice and professional development programmes don’t cover the skills employers are currently seeking–things like “emergent” leadership, adaptability, humility, and ownership.

At Google, hiring managers don’t care whether a candidate received perfect grades, served as president of the chess club, or even finished university. What they do care about–and what a rapidly increasing number of organisations care about–is soft skills like the ones mentioned above.

We need to be giving students more than a sum of knowledge reflected by a piece of paper. We need to be giving them the tools they need to be resourceful in a socially perceptive way, to innovate not just alone in a lab but with a group of colleagues, and to adapt when new requirements arise. READ MORE: 30 Tips to Cultivate Soft Skills in Your Students | InformED.

Build #STEM Skills, but Don’t Neglect the #Humanities | HBR #STEMMA @HarvardBiz


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Instead of just STEM, we should perhaps be promoting STEMMA — raising a new generation that also has greater capacities for managing collective human endeavors and appreciating the arts. Management education – the new “M” in the acronym – has not always been infused with humanistic thinking, but it must become more so. Our goal must be to cultivate the thoughtful enterprise leaders of the future. Meanwhile, regarding the “A,” how could it be beneficial to the future to deemphasize the arts, which inform our knowledge of beauty and meaning in human affairs? All the brilliant discoveries of STEM will not solve the grand challenges of today’s world — ignorance, poverty, intolerance, and political conflict – without the practical wisdom of humanities-trained leaders.

READ MORE: Build STEM Skills, but Don’t Neglect the Humanities | HBR

10 Tricks to Appear Smart in Meetings | The Cooper Review


via 10 Tricks to Appear Smart in Meetings | The Cooper Review

Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren’t Taught in School | LifeHacker #EmotionalIntelligence


You’re taught about history, science, and math when you’re growing up. Most of us, however, aren’t taught how to identify or deal with our own emotions, or the emotions of others. These skills can be valuable, but you’ll never get them in a classroom.

Emotional intelligence is a shorthand that psychological researchers use to describe how well individuals can manage their own emotions and react to the emotions of others. People who exhibit emotional intelligence have the less obvious skills necessary to get ahead in life, such as managing conflict resolution, reading and responding to the needs of others, and keeping their own emotions from overflowing and disrupting their lives. In this guide, we’ll look at what emotional intelligence is, and how to develop your own.

READ MORE: Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren’t Taught in School | LifeHacker

6 Articles on Creativity and Creative Thinking #creativity #brainstorm #creativethinking


Science Continues To Show Us How To Be More Creative | Will Burns | Forbes
Last year I compiled a list of scientific findings around the topic of creativity…Now, fast forward one year and I’ve discovered even more fascinating scientific studies on creativity. What we are seeing are even more tangible ways to trick ourselves into being more creative by getting ourselves – or, our reality – out of the way.

The Science Of Great Ideas–How to Train Your Creative Brain | Belle Beth Cooper | Fast Company | Business + Innovation
Creativity is a mystery right? Maybe not. Here’s a look at the science of the creative process and how to harness your brain’s power to come up with more great ideas.

How Creativity Works–And How To Harness Its Power | Leo Babauta | Fast Company | Business + Innovation
Creative ideas don’t just come out of the blue. Creativity is often a process of taking existing ideas and remixing them…Creativity is a powerful tool to help anyone, from the parent trying to find new things to inspire his kids, to the small businessperson looking for a new direction, to the writer or artist stuck or feeling uninspired. So in this post, I’ll briefly explain how creativity works (as I’ve observed it), and then share some tips on how to do it.

18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently | Carolyn Gregoire | Huffington Post
Creativity works in mysterious and often paradoxical ways. Creative thinking is a stable, defining characteristic in some personalities, but it may also change based on situation and context. Inspiration and ideas often arise seemingly out of nowhere and then fail to show up when we most need them, and creative thinking requires complex cognition yet is completely distinct from the thinking process…While there’s no “typical” creative type, there are some tell-tale characteristics and behaviors of highly creative people. Here are 18 things they do differently.

How To Cultivate A Creative Thinking Habit | Jane Porter | Fast Company | Business + Innovation
Creativity isn’t a mythical creature to be caught and tamed. It’s a habit, studies suggest; a way of life that’s built over time.

The Weird, Wonderful Social Network That Puts Your Creativity First | Chris Gayomali | Fast Company | Business + Innovation
For artists, writers, and other creative types, few things mean as much as a blank white page. Its emptiness serves as a frightening reminder that you have yet to create anything of value. Its indifference is something that even gifted geniuses like Roger Ebert had to learn to cope with. But Zach Verdin, the CEO and cofounder of NewHive, views the blank page more optimistically. He sees it as an open-ended symbol of creative possibilities…

Also See on Infophile:

Emotional Intelligence Predicts Job Success: Do You Have It? | Fast Company


Daniel Goleman, the psychologist who coined the term emotional intelligence, talked to the Huffington Post about the many characteristics of emotional intelligence. Lets go over a few here, so that we can know what to train in. READ MORE: Emotional Intelligence Predicts Job Success: Do You Have It? | Fast Company | Business + Innovation.

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How Technology Is Warping Your Memory | HuffPo


Take a moment to think about the last time you memorized someone’s phone number. Was it way back when, perhaps circa 2001? And when was the last time you were at a dinner party or having a conversation with friends, when you whipped out your smartphone to Google the answer to someones question? Probably last week.

Technology changes the way we live our daily lives, the way we learn, and the way we use our faculties of attention — and a growing body of research has suggested that it may have profound effects on our memories (particularly the short-term, or working, memory), altering and in some cases impairing its function.

The implications of a poor working memory on our brain functioning and overall intelligence levels are difficult to over-estimate…READ MORE: How Technology Is Warping Your Memory | HuffPo

My Brief and Curious Life As a Mechanical Turk | Gizmodo


As accomplished as modern-day computers are, there are some very basic things even the smartest machines have yet to master: tough judgment calls, advanced image recognition, making goofy faces, conducting psychological surveys. These are an assortment of tasks we humans can still claim as our own. Or at least, that we can outsource to other, less fortunate humans. Like me.

In Amazons words, Mechanical Turk is “a marketplace for work that requires human intelligence.” But in reality its even simpler than that description implies: Its a job board where the pay is low and the jobs are dumb. If you have a functional cerebral cortex, an internet connection, and a few minutes to spare, you can pick up a handful of odd jobs—the oddest of jobs—and make a few bucks, pennies, and nickels at a time. But whats it like to be that “human intelligence?” As I found out last year, its weird, fascinating, perplexing, and a little depressing, all at once.

READ MORE:  My Brief and Curious Life As a Mechanical Turk | Gizmodo

The Story Behind The Web’s Weirdest, Hardest Riddle | Co.Labs


The Story Behind The Webs Weirdest, Hardest Riddle ⚙ Co.Labs ⚙ code + community

In 2004 a small website appeared that contained a browser-based game called Notpron, which has since been hailed as “the hardest riddle on the Internet.” It consists of a series of 140 puzzles and riddles that get progressively more complex. Completing the game requires knowledge in a diverse range of fields including HTML programming, sound and graphics editing, music apprehension, research skills, and even remote viewing.

Out of the 17 million players that have attempted the game in the last decade only 31 have completed it. That’s just one in every 550,000 players–or, to put it another way, the chances you’ll be hit by lightning once in your lifetime are 41 times greater than they are for you solving Notpron.

To celebrate the games 10th anniversary I asked David Münnich, Notpron’s creator, to go down the rabbit hole of how and why it was created–and what it all means.

READ MORE: The Story Behind The Webs Weirdest, Hardest Riddle ⚙ Co.Labs ⚙ code + community.