Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read | The Atlantic #reading #memory #multimedia #books #information


Surely some people can read a book or watch a movie once and retain the plot perfectly. But for many, the experience of consuming culture is like filling up a bathtub, soaking in it, and then watching the water run down the drain. It might leave a film in the tub, but the rest is gone.

“Memory generally has a very intrinsic limitation,” says Faria Sana, an assistant professor of psychology at Athabasca University, in Canada. “It’s essentially a bottleneck.”

The “forgetting curve,” as it’s called, is steepest during the first 24 hours after you learn something. READ: Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read | The Atlantic

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Digital #Storytelling: An Opportunity for #Libraries to Lead in the Digital Age | Dr. Brian Detlor | Slideshare #tech #society


 

Video Game Link to Psychiatric Disorders Suggested by Study | The Guardian #gaming #psychology


People who regularly play action video games could be at increased risk of developing neurological and psychiatric disorders, a study suggests.

The research, published in a Royal Society journal on Wednesday, found that people who played games such as Call of Duty, Grand Theft Auto V and Tomb Raider were more likely to employ navigational strategies associated with decreased grey matter in the hippocampus part of the brain.

Decreased volume in the hippocampus has been associated with disorders such as schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and Alzheimer’s disease.

The lead study author, Prof Greg West, from the University of Montreal’s department of psychology, said the paper indicated that benefits of video games, such as improved attention and perception, highlighted in previous studies, could come at a price.

READ MORE: Video game link to psychiatric disorders suggested by study | Technology | The Guardian

How Technology Is Warping Your Memory | HuffPo


Take a moment to think about the last time you memorized someone’s phone number. Was it way back when, perhaps circa 2001? And when was the last time you were at a dinner party or having a conversation with friends, when you whipped out your smartphone to Google the answer to someones question? Probably last week.

Technology changes the way we live our daily lives, the way we learn, and the way we use our faculties of attention — and a growing body of research has suggested that it may have profound effects on our memories (particularly the short-term, or working, memory), altering and in some cases impairing its function.

The implications of a poor working memory on our brain functioning and overall intelligence levels are difficult to over-estimate…READ MORE: How Technology Is Warping Your Memory | HuffPo

‘Mind-reading’ technology can reconstruct faces from the viewer’s brain | CNET


Researchers at Yale have developed a method of reconstructing faces locked in the memories of other people. Read more: ‘Mind-reading’ technology can reconstruct faces from the viewer’s brain | CNET.