Age of the Data Scientist: Revolutionizing data analysis with cloud computing | Ciprian Jichici | Vimeo #datascience


Data is the new oil…money generated from data will exceed money that is generated from oil… – James Whittaker, Microsoft Distinguished Engineer

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Software solves mystery of 2,500 year-old poem by Sappho | Ars Technica #software #tech #science #analysis #poems #historical #archives


Science illuminates the dark night when the Greek poet looked to the heavens, lonely for her lover. Due to tantalizing hints in the poem, scholars have long debated when it was written. Now, thanks to software used to simulate night skies in planetariums, scientists have figured it out. READ MORE: Software solves the mystery of a 2,500 year-old poem by Sappho | Ars Technica

11 #Shakespeare Tragedies Mapped Out with Network Visualizations | Open Culture #dataviz #data #visualizations #analysis #plays #books


Every story has its architecture, its joints and crossbeams, ornaments and deep structure. The boundaries and scope of a story, its built environment, can determine the kind of story it is, tragedy, comedy, or otherwise. And every story also, it appears, generates a network—a web of weak and strong connections, hubs, and nodes. Take Shakespeare’s tragedies. We would expect their networks of characters to be dense, what with all those plays’ intrigues and feasts. And they are, according to digital humanities, data visualization, and network analysis scholar Martin Grandjean, who created the charts you see here:  READ MORE: 11 Shakespeare Tragedies Mapped Out with Network Visualizations | Open Culture

Scientists Discover That James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake Has an Amazingly Mathematical Multifractal Structure | Open Culture #literature #books #math #analysis


Source: Scientists Discover That James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake Has an Amazingly Mathematical “Multifractal” Structure | Open Culture

#Data Artist Proves Just How Unique Shakespeare’s 154 Sonnets Really Are | HuffPost #Shakespeare #poetry #analysis #visualization #art


In data artist Nicholas Rougeux’s new series of Shakespeare sonnet signatures, each poem is summarized with its own distinctive scribble — a shorthand that may not help them with Capital One, but allows readers to quickly visualize the individuality of each poem.  “No two are the same — or even similar,” Rougeux noted… READ MORE: Data Artist Proves Just How Unique Shakespeare’s 154 Sonnets Really Are | HuffPost

#Punctuation in #novels | Adam J. Calhoun | Medium #books #analysis #writing


When we think of novels, of newspapers and blogs, we think of words. We easily forget the little suggestions pushed in between: the punctuation. But how can we be so cruel to such a fundamental part of writing? Inspired by a series of posters, I wondered what did my favorite books look like without words. Can you tell them apart or are they all a-mush? In fact, they can be quite distinct. READ MORE: Punctuation in novels — Medium

New Platform Makes #Content Of #Videos As Searchable As Text | Fast Company #search #discovery #curation #data #contextual #analysis #machinelearning


To make poorly labeled videos easier to discover, Manhattan-based video analysis startup Dextro is launching a platform that analyzes and tags the contents of publicly available videos, using algorithms to identify common scenes, objects, and speech. Mic, a news site aimed at millennials, has partnered with Dextro and will use the platform, called Sight, Sound & Motion (SSM), to discover newsworthy videos that may otherwise be difficult to find. READ MORE: This New Platform Makes The Contents Of Videos As Searchable As Text | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

#Sex Talk in #Literature: How It’s Changed Over 200 Years | Flavorwire #books #research


Sex Talk in Literature: How It’s Changed Over 200 Years | Flavorwire

A British health website, DrEd.com, delved into the entire corpus of literature, both fiction and nonfiction, to explore the way certain words having to do with “venereal” matters have appeared, faded, or been associated with new companion words over the last two centuries. READ MORE: Sex Talk in Literature: How It’s Changed Over 200 Years | Flavorwire.

Et tu, Watson? IBM’s Supercomputer Can Critique Your #Writing | Engadget #tech #IBMWatson


It’s bad enough that robots are writing professionally (albeit badly), but now they’re criticizing, too? IBM has unveiled the Watson Tone Analyzer, the latest tool in its “cognitive computing” suite of cooking, health, shopping and other apps. Once you input a piece of text, the system will perform a “tone check” to analyze three different aspects of it: emotional, social and writing style. Each of those is divided into further categories — for instance, it can tell you if your writing style is confident or tentative, and whether the emotional tone is cheerful, angry or negative. From there, it can give you a breakdown of the overall tone and suggest new words to “fix” it. READ MORE: Et tu, Watson? IBM’s supercomputer can critique your writing | Engadget

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This is Your Brain on #JaneAusten, and Researchers at Stanford are Taking Notes | Stanford News #books #reading #neuroscience #cognition


Researchers observe the brain patterns of literary PhD candidates while they’re reading a Jane Austen novel. The fMRI images suggest that literary reading provides “a truly valuable exercise of people’s brains.” READ MORE: This is your brain on Jane Austen, and researchers at Stanford are taking notes | Stanford News